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Legislation Regulations

  • In late 2006, the German engineering giant Siemens, one of world’s largest companies, was engulfed in a corruption scandal.

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    The Federal Communications Commission will consider changes to the rules governing negotiations between cable providers and broadcast networks to prevent broadcast stations from removing their signals from cable companies if the parties fail to agree on retransmission fees. The New York Times reports.

  • The Federal Reserve headquarters in Washington, DC.

    The surge in 10-year Treasury yields above the psychological 3 percent level this week crowns a miserable period for bond traders and investors who bet on the Federal Reserve’s second round of quantitative easing policy, or QE2, being bullish for the market, reports the Financial Times.

  • Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wisc.), the incoming chairman of the House Budget Committee, told CNBC Wednesday that he would push for permanent lower tax rates, "real" spending cuts and entitlement reforms when Republicans take control of the House in January.

  • Member of Iran's Revolutionary Guard

    The Revolutionary Guard  is  a major force when it comes to controlling Iran's economy. Many Iranians in and out of the country have called the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps "Iran's mafia."

  • Stock Trader

    So-called marketing trips by senior executives, sponsored by the big investment banks certainly not small research firms like Broadband Research are very common, and are often great trading opportunities, writes John Kinnucan.

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    After the market closed Monday, Green Mountain Coffee issued a press release saying it would announce long-awaited and delayed fourth quarter financial results after the market’s close on December 9.

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    In addition to being extremely informative on the topic of how the largest banks in the U.S. nearly killed the country's economy, the following titles do a good job of taking you inside the halls, cubicles, meeting rooms and corner offices of some of the major players involved, giving you an accurate look at what life is like (and, in some cases, was like) on Wall Street. Of course, they're also quite entertaining.

  • Allen Stanford

    Newly released documents detail 12 years of fits and starts at the Securities and Exchange Commission as financier Allen Stanford was allegedly running a global Ponzi scheme.

  • Americans may be rare in Iran, but American products find their way into the country, despite international sanctions, through a tiny Iranian resort island called Kish.

  • David Einhorn

    Near-zero interest rates represent a very dangerous long-term policy, says David Einhorn, president of Greenlight Capital, who asserts that regulators have learned the wrong lessons from the latest financial crisis.

  • The company said Friday that current President Baxter Phillips will replace Blankenship.

  • google 111 eighth avenue

    In the biggest real estate deal of the year, Google signed a contract on Thursday to buy one of the largest office buildings in Manhattan for more than $1.8 billion, according to two real estate executives who have been briefed on the deal, the New York Times reports.

  • Some investors think it gives them an edge, but Cramer says it’s a waste of time. And it ain’t worth the prison sentence.

  • Empty Wallet

    We cannot balance the budget by soaking the rich or the middle class, and we cannot do it by turning our backs on the truly needy. We must find the right balance of tax increases that do not impede incentives for economic growth, spending cuts that are phased in over time to reduce the impact on those in need, and eliminating or reducing unnecessary or bloated government programs.

  • Health care protestor.

    Congress will tweak but not repeal health care legislation, insurers won't take a bit hit from reform measures, sector consolidation will continue and China will drive growth for drug and device makers.

  • America's "Number 1 domestic problem," the federal deficit, took center stage on Wednesday morning as President Obama's bipartisan deficit commission released its findings. Some members of the 18-member bipartisan deficit commission, appearing on CNBC Wednesday, weighed in with their thoughts. To read the full report,

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    The Federal Trade Commission advocated a plan on Wednesday that lets consumers on the Internet choose whether they want information about their browsing habits to be collected, an option known as “do not track.” The New York Times reports.

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    The Fed's massive data disclosure on which institutions got bailout money will be interesting from a historical standpoint but unlikely to be meaningful for investors.

  • Soda

    As Congress considers new ways to cut spending, here's one idea health advocates are pushing: prevent people on food stamps from using benefits to buy sweetened sodas.