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Legislation Regulations

  • FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair on CNBC'c Power Lunch

    Regulators are struggling to create a global mechanism that could wind down a big financial institution without the disruption caused by Lehman Brothers’ collapse in 2008, reports the Financial Times.

  • Regulatory pressures have changed the landscape of how businesses are choosing to use their capital.

  • Texting and driving is as dangerous and driving while drunk, Clarence Ditlow, executive director of the Center for Auto Safety, told CNBC Monday. Such sentiment, fueled by the increasing number of cell-phone-related accidents, is part of what is driving a nation-wide ban on combining the two activities.

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    Among the most wrong-headed of possible SEC proposals to “fix” the markets is a sentimental appeal to establish a “special status” for market makers like the days of old when “the specialists on the dominant exchanges were subject to significant trading obligations designed to promote fair and orderly markets and fair treatment of investors.”

  • Trucks on roadway.

    According to several trade groups in the trucking industry, there could be a shortage of drivers next year, and the estimates range from 200,000 to as many as 500,000.

  • Foreclosure

    As a scandal unfolds over shoddy preparation of foreclosure documents, the fallout is beginning to hammer the housing market, especially in states like Florida, the NY Times reports.

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    Working as a trader or an investment banker at a European bank might be about to get a whole lot less lucrative. The FT reports.

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    With Greece hitting its marks on the financial bailout earlier this year, it is now taking steps to streamline business and investment processes to promote growth, the country’s finance minister, George Papaconstantinou, told CNBC Thursday.

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    In her new book, YOU KNOW I'M RIGHT More Prosperity, Less Government she takes on today's toughest issues: the deficit, unemployment, health care, education, housing and immigration.

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    In recent years, some 20,000 people have turned to American Tax Relief after seeing the company’s advertisements on television where actors portraying clients say the company reduced their back taxes , reports the New York Times.

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  • A group of Washington Mutual creditors have signed on to a settlement that pushes the bank's reorganization plan a step closer to approval.

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    Despite the recent run-up in stocks, Kyle Bass, managing partner of Hyman Capital, thinks other asset classes are better for investors.

  • US Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner will call on emerging nations to show more flexibility on currencies in exchange for a greater say in international financial institutions, a Treasury official told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Foreclosure Sign

    The uproar over bad conduct by mortgage lenders intensified Tuesday, as lawmakers in Washington requested a federal investigation and the attorney general in Texas joined a chorus of state law enforcement figures calling for freezes on all foreclosures, reports the New York Times.

  • IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn

    The head of the International Monetary Fund has warned that governments are risking a currency war if they try to use exchange rates to solve domestic problems, reports the Financial Times.

  • Cash and credit card

    As new regulations push banks toward safer investments and lending practices, the middle class will suffer the most, analyst Meredith Whitney told CNBC.

  • FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair on CNBC'c Power Lunch

    The US needs to deleverage the financial system and restore market discipline and must keep the effects of protracted low interest rates in mind, as a bond bubble seems to be developing, FDIC Chairwoman Sheila Bair told CNBC.

  • Harrisburg, PA

    A growing number of towns, cities and other local governments are seeking refuge in  havens many states provide as alternatives to federal bankruptcy court, the NY Times reports.

  • NYSE trader

    When Capitol Hill set out to force derivatives onto exchanges, lawmakers carved out a broad exemption for so-called "end users" — non-financial companies seeking to hedge their exposure to fluctuations in currencies, commitments and interest rates. An ambiguity in the Dodd-Frank financial reforms, however, threatens to undermine the end-user exemption