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  • Order vs. disorder in Mideast: Tom Friedman

    Thomas Friedman, New York Times columnist, shares his thoughts on establishing order in the Middle East amid chaos and dealing with ISIS.

  • A worker walks at Nahr Bin Umar oil field, Iraq, Nov. 23, 2014.

    A seasonal event that happens every year may be what finally pushes oil prices to rock bottom.

  • Could $30 oil be on the cards?

    David Hewitt, co-head of global oil & gas equity research at Credit Suisse, discusses the possibility of oil prices falling to $30 a barrel.

  • A worker walks at Nahr Bin Umar oil field, Iraq, Nov. 23, 2014.

    Increased pumping by OPEC as Chinese demand appears to be slackening could drive oil to the lowest prices since the peak of the financial crisis.

  • Saudi's cash deficit

    Insight to the stability of Saudi Arabia's economy, with Greg Priddy, Eurasia Group.

  • Saudi, Russia: Expect closer relationship

    Russian foreign minister, Sergey Lavrov, is to meet Saudi Arabian counterpart on Tuesday, with talks expected to be based on energy and the Middle East.

  • Commodities next week: Oil down 6th straight week

    CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks ahead at where oil and precious metals are likely headed next week.

  • A worker pauses while drilling for oil on a derrick in the Bakken shale formation outside Watford City, North Dakota.

    The oil market is setting up for a prolonged period of low prices.

  • oil

    Analysts say oil market fundamentals are very bearish, and it would not be surprising to see crude take a temporary dive into the $30s per barrel in the next several months.

  • Oil dip triggers global trouble spots

    Helima Croft, RBC Capital Markets, discusses how cheap crude prices are impacting oil-focused economies and whether prices are headed lower from here.

  • Oil worker near pump jack

    Oil prices have now broken below many Wall Street targets and look set to test the year's lows and beyond, before finding a bottom.

  • Buffalo Wild Wings Inc. signage is displayed outside of a restaurant in San Ramon, California.

    Jim Cramer opens up his chest of knowledge to explain the real catalyst behind what drives a stock to explode on earnings.

  • A file photo shows an Iranian worker at the South Pars field in the southern Iranian port town of Asaluyeh.

    The Iran nuclear deal could help stabilize oil prices and even give them a boost, says Nasdaq's Tamar Essner. But here's what has to happen first.

  • Turmoil in the Middle East, an unimpressive international stock market debut and tumbling oil prices will hit the wealth of Saudi Arabia's richest in years to come, according to a new report from WealthInsight.

  • A worker prepares to lift drills by pulley

    U.S. oil futures closed below the psychologically important $50 level—possibly signaling more declines to come and a retest of the March lows.

  • CNBC update: Egg McMuffins for all!

    Defense secretary Ash Carter arrives in Saudi Arabia for scheduled meetings with King Salman; one of Indonesia's busiest international airports closes due to a volcanic eruption; and McDonald's could start offering all day breakfast, reports CNBC's Courtney Reagan.

  • A customer prepares to fuel her vehicle at a Road Ranger gas station in Princeton, Illinois.

    With U.S. refineries running at record levels, the global oil glut is turning into a fuel glut.

  • Two veiled women look at smart phone brands in Paytakht computer mall in Tehran, Iran.

    European and Asian business could pour into Iran if sanctions are lifted, but U.S. law would keep most Americans on the sidelines.

  • Iran deal: Not perfect, but better than nothing

    James Acton, Co-director of the Nuclear Policy Program at Carnegie Endowment, explains why Tuesday's nuclear deal is better than existing alternatives.

  • Oil to come under pressure: Wells Fargo

    Margaret Patel, Portfolio Manager at Wells Fargo Funds Management, says incremental supply from Iran is likely to be a catalyst for lower oil prices going forward.