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  • Commodities Next Week: Ukraine moves oil

    CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets. Increased tensions in Ukraine spiked oil prices today. Corn and wheat also spiked on geopolitical concerns.

  • Pump jacks and wells on the Monterey Shale formation in California

    The Middle East and other oil-producing countries are hotbeds of instability. So why is oil falling instead of rising?

  • Commodities Next Week: Energy mixed

    CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks ahead at where oil and precious metals are likely headed next week. WTI was down but Brent crude was up on the day. Nat gas was down and gold was up.

  • A Nabors Industries floor hand uses a towel to wipe drilling fluid from a section of pipe on a crude oil rig outside New Town, N.D.

    U.S. shale has put the country on the same terrain as Saudi Arabia and Russia. In the process, it may turn oil into a safe haven.

  • Saudi Arabia: What foreign investors expect

    Hootan Yazhari, head of frontier markets equity research at BofA Merrill Lynch, explains why Saudi Arabia's move to open its market to foreign investors as a "huge game-changer for the region".

  • Saudi Arabia to open market to foreign investors

    Nour Al Hammoury, chief market strategist at ADS Securities, says it's a "historic day" for Saudi Arabia and the region, as the kingdom announces it will soon open its market to foreign investors.

  • Commodities Next Week: Oil, gold down on day

    CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks ahead at where oil and precious metals are likely headed next week.

  • Commodities Next Week: Oil continues its slide

    CNBC's Jackie DeAngelis discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets and looks ahead at where oil and precious metals are likely headed next week. Oil was down on the day, as was gold, although it still closed over $1,335.

  • Construction of the Keystone Pipeline in Prague, Okla., (L) and an oil pipeline in northeastern Saudi Arabia.

    The U.S. is producing vast amounts of oil—but isn't quite in Saudi Arabia's league just yet, according to experts.

  • Condensates—a super-light oil that's a byproduct of the U.S shale boom—could open the door to eventual crude exports.

  • Destabilization risk greater than Iraq: Expert

    Providing his perspective on Iraq, former U.S. Secretary of Defense William Cohen, says the most important thing to do is sure up the defenses in Jordan and Saudi Arabia to prevent ISIS from destabilizing both countries.

  • Will Saudi Arabia curb oil prices rally?

    Ole Hansen, senior commodity strategist at Saxo Bank, comments on the oil market and says while there is no big problem, investors are trading "on the back of fears that could happen".

  • "This is going to burn for a long time," said Kenneth Pollack, a Brookings Institution senior fellow and a former CIA Iraq military analyst.

  • Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    Energy stocks may be getting too rich and could quickly give up gains if the Iraq situation is defused, some analysts said.

  • 'No risk' for oil price: Saudi oil minister

    Ali bin Ibrahim Al-Naimi, Saudi oil minister, says that there is "no risk" for the oil price at the moment and that only speculation makes the price fluctuate.

  • OPEC headquarters in Vienna.

    Oil sitting comfortably over $100 a barrel leaves OPEC ministers with an easy task to leave output steady at their meeting.

  • Oil tanker at the Port of Long Beach, Calif.

    Advocates for more oil exports say it will lower U.S. energy costs. Not so fast, say their opponents.

  • This solar thermal power-tower system at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in the Mojave Desert near Primm, Nev., is the largest in the world and is owned by Google, NRG Energy and BrightSource Energy.

    The U.S. is the third-largest solar market, and it's growing rapidly because of private investment and federal support.

  • This undated electron microscope image made available by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases - Rocky Mountain Laboratories shows a novel coronavirus particle, also known as the MERS virus.

    It's new, it's undoubtedly deadly. But is MERS creating too much panic? That may be the case, says one expert.

  • Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi

    The co-chief executive of EFG Hermes told CNBC that Egypt was undergoing political rejuvenation, meaning it had a lot to offer investors.