Government Agencies SEC

  • Allen Stanford

    The court-appointed receiver who is trying to unwind the alleged Allen Stanford Ponzi scheme says he has identified $1.5 billion in assets that could be returned to victims.

  • Allen Stanford

    Eight months after he seized control of what was left of their life's savings, a court-appointed attorney in Dallas has finally met with investors in the alleged Stanford Ponzi scheme, CNBC has learned.

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    Roomy Khan, the central witness who brought down the Galleon hedge fund, is a former Galleon employee with a history of financial trouble who agreed to cooperate with prosecutors after she was caught making trades using inside information, the New York Times reports.

  • Raj Rajaratnam

    Galleon Group is winding down its hedge fund holdings, the company's embattled CEO Raj Rajaratnam said in a statement.

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    There are a lot of bad guys still out there, the Mad Money host says. Memo to the US government: Go get ‘em.

  • In the past two years, powerful figures in both Washington and Wall Street became household names as the crisis deepened, markets and corporations struggled to survive and the federal government took drastic steps to save the economy. Whether they had a crucial hand in the crisis or were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time may not be clear for years. Now, one year after the roughest stretch for the U.S. economy since the Great Depression, these financial titans have either stepped out of

    A year after the roughest stretch for the U.S. economy since the Great Depression, these financial titans have either stepped out of the spotlight or come to the end of their careers.

  • Raj Rajaratnam

    The biggest commodity on Wall Street is information, and savvy players will do almost anything for it, the New York Times reports.

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    Here's how you hold your own against insider traders and money managers alike.

  • John Mack

    The financial system needs more efficient regulation that would happen by streamlining, not expanding, the current mechanisms, Morgan Stanley CEO John Mack told CNBC.

  • Women and Retirement

    The nation's largest pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System, said it is investigating fees paid to an outside manager that directed the fund's investments.

  • Allen Stanford

    Federal prosecutors say they can be ready to try accused fraudster Allen Stanford a year from now, but the Judge in the case has agreed to hold off on setting a trial date for at least 60 days, after defense attorneys said they needed more time to review the millions of documents in the case.

  • Two former investors are suing the Securities and Exchange Commission for $2.4 billion in damages, claiming the agency acted with negligence while examining Bernard Madoff's investment business.

  • US Supreme Court

    The new Supreme Court term that begins Monday will be dominated by cases concerning corporations, compensation and the financial markets that could signal the justices’ attitude toward regulatory constraints at a time of extraordinary government intervention in the economy.

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    Bank of America CEO Ken Lewis, the embattled head of the nation's biggest bank, told the board he plans to step down by the end of the year.

  • David Kotz

    The internal watchdog at the Securities and Exchange Commission is recommending dozens of reforms at the agency following its failure to detect the Madoff Ponzi scheme.

  • Allen Stanford

    Accused fraudster Allen Stanford will be moved to a federal detention facility in downtown Houston "by Thursday," his attorney told CNBC.

  • It’s about time the markets’ top regulator did its job, the Mad Money host says.

  • Ratings agencies need to adopt universal standards to prevent the kinds of abuses that helped fuel the collapse of the credit markets, an industry whistleblower told CNBC.

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    The Securities and Exchange Commission spends a lot of time and money trying to discover insider trading in stocks. But when it comes to structured financial products — the funny securities that were at the heart of the financial crisis — it has just adopted a proposal that will facilitate such trading, says the NYT's Floyd Norris.

  • Bank of America CEO Ken Lewis won't resign if he is slapped with civil charges from New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, but he's likely to leave if he is charged by the Securities and Exchange Commission, sources inside the Bank have told CNBC.