Government Agencies SEC

  • Bewrkshire Hathaway: What's the Risk?

    Berkshire Hathaway isn't happy with a Reuters story initially published with the headline, "Buffett's Berkshire: We Goofed On Derivative Risks."  Berkshire CFO Marc Hamburg tells Warren Buffett Watch, "There is no indication whatsoever in my letter to the SEC that we made an error or that we underestimated the risks of falling stock prices."

  • The SEC has issued a Wells notice to hedge fund Pequot Capital Management and its founder Arthur Samberg for allegedly trading on nonpublic information on Microsoft stock in 2001, CNBC has learned.The notice, which focuses solely on the firm's trading of Microsoft stock in spring 2001, was issued about one month ago. It alleges the firm traded on material nonpublic information.

  • State Street is down midday on a headline from the WSJ: "$625M reserve for exposure to sub-prime crisis 'May not be sufficient."

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    This week General Electric agreed to pay $50 million to settle a suit filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission that said the company fiddled with its books repeatedly early in this decade. In at least one case, that allowed it to preserve its reputation for making the numbers. Some of the details are eerily reminiscent of Enron.

  • Maurice "Hank" Greenberg

    The SEC said Thursday that former American International Group CEO Maurice "Hank" Greenberg agreed to pay a $15 million fine to settle fraud charges.

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    A regulatory ban on so-called flash trading, which gives some big brokerage firms a split-second advantage in buying and selling stocks, will take time to implement, Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Mary Schapiro told CNBC.

  • Why should they suffer for the CEO’s mistakes?

  • The Mad Money host presents both the technical and fundamental cases for owning Bank of America.

  • Investors are whispering about the latest government crackdown on Wall Street. With tighter regulations imminent, what happens to profits?

  • Accused fraudster Allen Stanford once claimed a net worth of more than $2 billion. But with all of his assets frozen by a federal judge, he has no funds to pay his high-powered criminal defense lawyer, Dick DeGuerin of Houston.

  • The receiver appointed by the courts to take over the companies run by Texas financier R. Allen Stanford is meeting resistance in his efforts to recover money the government says went missing in a Ponzi scheme.

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    The court-appointed receiver in the Stanford Financial case—whose job is to locate funds to return to investors—is suing some 400 of them in a controversial "clawback" case.

  • Plus, an updated call on The India Fund and more.

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    The court-appointed receiver in the Stanford Financial case—whose job is to locate funds to return to investors—is suing some 400 of them in a controversial "clawback" case.

  • Wonder why your returns don’t look like the pros? Turns out they may have an unfair advantage.

  • The bill was was approved Tuesday by the House Financial Services Committee, which Frank chairs. The measure was approved in a 40-28 party-line vote.

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    The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Justice Department are defending their investigations of the alleged $8 billion Stanford Financial fraud. This, following an investigation by the SEC's Inspector General — first reported by CNBC — that concluded the SEC "effectively halted" its investigation last year at the Justice Department's request.

  • BlackRock's headquarters in New York.

    Giant money manager BlackRock is putting together an investment fund that it says will give ordinary Americans a chance to profit from the financial bailouts that they are paying for.

  • Wall Street

    The financial crisis may have left investment banking bruised and embarrassed, but analysts say an industry comeback is on the way, even if it means competing in a dramatically different marketplace.

  • Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    It is the hot new thing on Wall Street, a way for a handful of traders to master the stock market, peek at investors’ orders and, critics say, even subtly manipulate share prices.