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Government Agencies SEC

  • wamu_new.jpg

    Bank holding company Washington Mutual has asked a federal court for the power to make the Federal Reserve, the U.S. Treasury, and a long list of other parties turn over documents and witness interviews related to the bank's 2008 collapse.

  • Arthur Nadel

    A trial has been set for April 26 in the case of Arthur Nadel, the Sarasota, Fla., philanthropist and hedge fund manager who became the first alleged "mini-Madoff" when the six funds he managed went bust earlier this year.

  • wallstreet_senate.jpg

    The House approved a legislative package of historic sweeping financial reforms Friday, but the vote in the Democratically-controlled chamber was closer than many had predicted.

  • Bank of America

    The Securities and Exchange Commission will continue to "vigorously pursue" its charges against Bank of America over disclosure of bonuses to employees of Merrill Lynch, a top agency official said Friday.

  • Conrad Black arriving at a federal courthouse on June 18, 2007.

    A lawyer for former media baron Conrad Black urged the Supreme Court Tuesday to overturn his fraud conviction, and several justices asked whether the federal law at issue was too vague.

  • More than 200 investors in Texas billionaire Allen Stanford's alleged Ponzi scheme face a new lawsuit from the court-appointed receiver who is gathering assets from the Stanford empire.

  • Federal Reserve

    A congressional plan to audit the Federal Reserve's decision-making process poses a serious threat to the economy, former Fed governor Frederic Mishkin said.

  • Bernard Madoff

    Bernard Madoff's bankruptcy trustee and the law firm employing him submitted a $22.1 million legal bill covering five months of work.  Baker & Hostetler LLP is seeking $21.28 million of fees as counsel to court-appointed trustee Irving Picard for the five months ended Sept.

  • Allen Stanford

    Potential losses to U.S. investors in Texas financier Allen Stanford's alleged Ponzi scheme are far more widespread than initially feared, according to a new analysis obtained by CNBC.

  • Money managers hire this company to keep their deals, and their consciences, clean.

  • JP Morgan Chase

    JPMorgan Chase has agreed to a settlement worth more than $700 million over federal regulators' charges that it made unlawful payments to friends of public officials to win municipal bond business in Jefferson County, Ala.

  • Disgraced financier Bernard Madoff's longtime auditor has entered a guilty plea in a federal court in Manhattan.

  • Bernie Madoff mugshot

    Jailed swindler Bernie Madoff said it was "amazing" that he didn't get caught sooner in his multi-billion-dollar Ponzi scheme, and that everything the SEC did to investigate him prior to 2006 was a waste of time, according to a jailhouse interview he gave to SEC Inspector General H. David Kotz.

  • Potential losses to U.S. investors in Texas financier Allen Stanford's alleged Ponzi scheme are far more widespread than initially feared, according to a new analysis obtained by CNBC.

  • Allen Stanford

    The court-appointed receiver who is trying to unwind the alleged Allen Stanford Ponzi scheme says he has identified $1.5 billion in assets that could be returned to victims.

  • Allen Stanford

    Eight months after he seized control of what was left of their life's savings, a court-appointed attorney in Dallas has finally met with investors in the alleged Stanford Ponzi scheme, CNBC has learned.

  • khan_roomy.jpg

    Roomy Khan, the central witness who brought down the Galleon hedge fund, is a former Galleon employee with a history of financial trouble who agreed to cooperate with prosecutors after she was caught making trades using inside information, the New York Times reports.

  • Raj Rajaratnam

    Galleon Group is winding down its hedge fund holdings, the company's embattled CEO Raj Rajaratnam said in a statement.

  • MM_promo_Cramerica_Challenge_530x50.jpg

    There are a lot of bad guys still out there, the Mad Money host says. Memo to the US government: Go get ‘em.

  • In the past two years, powerful figures in both Washington and Wall Street became household names as the crisis deepened, markets and corporations struggled to survive and the federal government took drastic steps to save the economy. Whether they had a crucial hand in the crisis or were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time may not be clear for years. Now, one year after the roughest stretch for the U.S. economy since the Great Depression, these financial titans have either stepped out of

    A year after the roughest stretch for the U.S. economy since the Great Depression, these financial titans have either stepped out of the spotlight or come to the end of their careers.