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  • Jerry Bowyer

    A Louisiana political wag famously said “Vote for the adulterer; it’s important’. He was referring to a congressional face off between a highly corrupt machine politician, and a reformer who had once consorted with prostitutes.

  • Henry Paulson

    During its weeklong deliberations, Congress made many changes to the Bush administration’s original proposal to bail out the financial industry, but one overarching aspect of the initial plan that remains is the vast discretion it gives to the Treasury secretary, says the New York Times.

  • In a mood reminiscent of WaMu-JP Morgan, the FDIC says Citi is buying Wachovia's banking operations, and assume the senior and subordinated debt.

  • Christopher Cox

    A government audit obtained by CNBC blasts the Securities and Exchange Commission's handling of the investment banking crisis. In response, the SEC says it is scrapping the way it regulates big investment banks.

  • As Wall Street struggles to find a way forward, many on Main Street are asking how we got here in the first place.

  • Hedge funds executives tell CNBC that several Wall Street firms are marketing a new hedging product that would allow them to "short" stocks-, even those on the banned short sale list.

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    Investors who think the ban on short selling provides a buying opportunity could get stung by a likely selloff when the rules expire Oct. 2.

  • The theory is that this is the three-day delivery date for shorts. Stocks have three days to "clear" or deliver the goods. Remember the SEC banned short selling in financials Thursday night, so this is the last chance to cover those short positions, and this may create a modest rise in the market toward the close.

  • This market reminds Cramer of the crash of '87. So preserve capital and raise cash and at any opportunity.

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    Institutional money managers will not have to disclose their short positions to the public immediately, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission said on Sunday

  • WALL STREET IN CRISIS - A CNBC SPECIAL REPORT

    You don't have to be a day trader to feel the pain that the shorts have inflicted on the market.

  • Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson discusses a comprehensive approach to market developments, while Gold was up over 15% over the past two days but took a beating this morning. Following are today's top videos:

  • U.S. money management firm The Reserve said on Friday two of its funds have filed an application with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission asking to be allowed to suspend or delay redemption requests due to a massive rush by investors to withdraw their money.

  • Plus, Cramer clarifies Thursday's call on Goldman Sachs and more.

  • Many on Wall Street have decried the Treasury secretary's plan to clear the market of bad mortgage-related paper. Cramer's not one of them.

  • This week's wild ride on Wall Street literally mimicked a rollercoaster ride: a couple of stomach-turning drops before coasting to the end and dropping you off exactly where you started.  After being down by nearly 1000 points at Wednesday's close, the Dow clawed back those 1000 points in the following two days leaving the blue-chip index off just about 40 points from where it ended last Friday!

  • Several companies with large operations in the financial services sector are looking to be added to the government's list of stocks that cannot be sold short.

  • The Securities and Exchange Commission temporarily banned short-selling on 799 financial stocks to boost investor confidence on Friday, one day after the UK Financial Services Authority took a similar step. Take our poll:

  • Cramer responds to the Washington's latest moves to bring stability to the market.

  • This week's wild ride on Wall Street is starting to look like just that — a ride — because the Dow is on track to end roughly where it was last Friday.