Investing Securities

  • ETF

    Investors poured a record $55 billion in new cash into stock mutual funds and exchange-traded funds in January, thresearch provider TrimTabs Investment Research said.

  • President Obama with Mary Jo White and Richard Cordray.

    President Obama nominated Mary Jo White to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission, tapping an attorney with broad experience in prosecuting white-collar crimes to lead an agency that has a central role in implementing Wall Street reform.

  • Inside the SEC Crime Lab

    CNBC's Gary Kaminsky takes a look inside the SEC crime lab, where six terabytes of digital data, emails and documents come in for review every month.

  • A financial trading tax (FTT) planned by a group of euro zone nations could leave major banks, its main target, relatively unscathed while less nimble smaller trading houses, pension funds and asset managers bear the brunt.

  • The nascent market for "dim sum" bonds - denominated in Chinese yuan but issued outside the mainland - is poised for strong growth this year, gaining traction even as China opens its own markets to lure investors' money directly inside its borders.

  • Yield-chasing investors, whose hunger for income powered a long rally in Asian junk-rated bonds, are finally feeling the first symptoms of indigestion after a year-long binge.

  • Whether it was stocks or bonds, trading revenues declined or stayed flat at major banks, which reported earnings this week.

  • Eager to dig homeowners out from under a $374 billion mortgage mountain, South Korea is moving to let its banks start selling securities similar to those at the center of the 2007 U.S. housing crisis.

  • John Kinnucan

    A securities research analyst who had publicly refused to cooperate in a sweeping government insider trading probe was sentenced to more than four years in prison Tuesday.

  • Even Muni Bonds May Be Targeted in 'Fiscal Cliff' Talks

    The big returns on high-yield debt won't continue in 2013 as price increases stall, but they should still offer low- to mid-single digit returns, Jeffrey Rosenberg, BlackRock's chief investment strategist for fixed income, told CNBC on Friday.

  • Robert Khuzami, the enforcement director at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission who worked to rebuild the SEC's tarnished image after the Madoff scandal and the financial crisis, is departing the agency, the SEC announced on Wednesday.

  • Nowadays, Wall Street Saviors May Wish They Weren’t

    Despite so-called "fiscal cliff" worries, the S&P 500 has had an improbable run.

  • Mathew Martoma to Be Arraigned on Securities Fraud

    CNBC's Mary Thompson reports the latest details on former hedge fund portfolio manager Mathew Martoma's arraignment in New York City on insider trading charges.

  • Italy sold all the bills and bonds it aimed to at an auction on Thursday, a few days after outgoing Prime Minister Mario Monti announced he may join the election race to lead a reform-minded centrist alliance.

  • Debate over potential fixes for the "fiscal cliff" has thrown the municipal bond market into turmoil, but the selling may now be overdone, Alexandra Lebenthal, CEO of Lebenthal & Co., told CNBC.

  • Apple's stock plunge is hurting investors who chased hot mutual funds that loaded up on Apple as the stock raced to a record $705 per share.

  • U.S. regulators and exchanges are getting closer to a framework for a "kill switch" that could be used to shut down trading before software glitches wreak havoc on markets.

  • gavel.jpg

    Two former hedge fund managers were convicted on Monday of illegal trading in Dell stock based on secret information supplied by research analysts.

  • President Barack Obama is not ready to accept a new offer from the Republicans to raise taxes on top earners in exchange for major cuts in entitlement programs, a source said late on Saturday.

  • Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

    Fitch Ratings stuck by its triple-A rating on France in a much-awaited review on Friday but warned that an expected peak in debt in 2014 was the limit it could agree to for a country with a top-notch credit grade.