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  • Eager to dig homeowners out from under a $374 billion mortgage mountain, South Korea is moving to let its banks start selling securities similar to those at the center of the 2007 U.S. housing crisis.

  • John Kinnucan

    A securities research analyst who had publicly refused to cooperate in a sweeping government insider trading probe was sentenced to more than four years in prison Tuesday.

  • Even Muni Bonds May Be Targeted in 'Fiscal Cliff' Talks

    The big returns on high-yield debt won't continue in 2013 as price increases stall, but they should still offer low- to mid-single digit returns, Jeffrey Rosenberg, BlackRock's chief investment strategist for fixed income, told CNBC on Friday.

  • Robert Khuzami, the enforcement director at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission who worked to rebuild the SEC's tarnished image after the Madoff scandal and the financial crisis, is departing the agency, the SEC announced on Wednesday.

  • Nowadays, Wall Street Saviors May Wish They Weren’t

    Despite so-called "fiscal cliff" worries, the S&P 500 has had an improbable run.

  • Mathew Martoma to Be Arraigned on Securities Fraud

    CNBC's Mary Thompson reports the latest details on former hedge fund portfolio manager Mathew Martoma's arraignment in New York City on insider trading charges.

  • Italy sold all the bills and bonds it aimed to at an auction on Thursday, a few days after outgoing Prime Minister Mario Monti announced he may join the election race to lead a reform-minded centrist alliance.

  • Debate over potential fixes for the "fiscal cliff" has thrown the municipal bond market into turmoil, but the selling may now be overdone, Alexandra Lebenthal, CEO of Lebenthal & Co., told CNBC.

  • Apple's stock plunge is hurting investors who chased hot mutual funds that loaded up on Apple as the stock raced to a record $705 per share.

  • U.S. regulators and exchanges are getting closer to a framework for a "kill switch" that could be used to shut down trading before software glitches wreak havoc on markets.

  • gavel.jpg

    Two former hedge fund managers were convicted on Monday of illegal trading in Dell stock based on secret information supplied by research analysts.

  • President Barack Obama is not ready to accept a new offer from the Republicans to raise taxes on top earners in exchange for major cuts in entitlement programs, a source said late on Saturday.

  • Eiffel Tower in Paris, France.

    Fitch Ratings stuck by its triple-A rating on France in a much-awaited review on Friday but warned that an expected peak in debt in 2014 was the limit it could agree to for a country with a top-notch credit grade.

  • Greece's bond buyback scheme failed to meet its target by a relatively narrow margin on Tuesday but still left international lenders with a 450-million euro hole in their plan to cut the country's huge debts to a more manageable level.

  • Angela Merkel and Antonis Samaras

    Greece will extend a debt buyback that forms part of its international bailout for an extra day to receive additional offers from bondholders, a government official said on Monday.

  • A123 Systems logo

    China's largest maker of auto parts won a politically sensitive auction for A123 Systems, a bankrupt maker of batteries for electric cars that was funded partly with U.S. government money, the investment banker for A123 said on Saturday.

  • Greek and foreign bondholders offered the targeted 30 billion euros in a debt buyback that is key to the country's international bailout, a Greek government official said on Saturday, suggesting the plan had broadly succeeded.

  • Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix

    Netflix CEO Reed Hastings violates SEC fair disclosure regulation, said Wedbush Securities analyst Michael Pachter.

  • baidu-sign_200.jpg

    China's three dominant dot-com names - Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent Holdings - have successfully tapped global funding this year despite investor skepticism about opaque Chinese companies. The big three plan to use the money to pad their industry advantage at home, to compete better abroad, and perhaps to buy cash-starved rivals.

  • Privatizing Greece, Slowly but Not Surely

    Greece has hired Deutsche Bank and Morgan Stanley to conduct a voluntary buy back of its debt, a senior finance ministry official told Reuters.