Investing Securities

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  • Federal_reserve_blg_seal3.jpg

    Markets might be getting ahead of themselves in anticipating some bold new moves from the Federal Reserve to combat the weakening economy.

  • mortgage_calculator.jpg

    While officials and economists generally regard the program as successful in supporting the housing market, it has left the Fed holding a vast pile of mortgage securities—basically i.o.u.’s from homeowners—that it does not want and cannot sell.

  • capitol_building_2_200.jpg

    The chief executive of Moody's says his company's inaccurate ratings of mortgage-related investments were "deeply disappointing" but investors shouldn't rely on ratings to buy or sell securities.

  • NY Stock Exchange Traders

    Brokers selling complex securities that they once contended were safe and sound have saddled individual investors with billions in losses since the credit bubble burst. Remember auction-rate securities? Those were peddled to investors as just as good as cash — until they no longer were after that market seized up in 2008. The NYT reports.

  • CNBC "Fast Money" trader is testing the derivative waters by purchasing a bond containing mortgages from 13 states.

  • skillingcuffed_154x122.jpg

    How much do you know about one of the biggest business scandals of all time? Take our Enron quiz and find out.

  • gavel and money

    Break out the bubbly, for at long last we have irrefutable evidence that the Great Recovery is at hand: Here come the lawyers.

  • Small caps are getting pricey, but there's still opportunities to be found, says Citigroup strategist Lori Calvasina.

  • gavel.jpg

    The collapse of the auction-rate securities market is a largely forgotten part of the financial crisis, a disaster that was soon overwhelmed by bigger ones — except for the investors who were caught up in it.

  • Bank of America

    It’s been four decades since the go-go years of the late 1960s, when hot mutual funds captured the imagination of investors by reporting performance that was too good to be true. It’s been so long that Bank of America seems to have forgotten what happened.

  • Wall Street Traders

    The Fed meeting and a record $104 billion of Treasury auctions are the big hurdles for the market this week. Plus, weekend news that Apple chief Steve Jobs had a liver transplant will put techs in focus.

  • Wall Street Traders

    Stocks could have a hard time snapping out of their current trading range, which seems to be getting narrower and narrower.

  • wall_street_sign.jpg

    Much better-than-expected jobs numbers drew little more than a collective yawn from Wall Street on Friday, and some market experts think that could actually be a good thing.

  • I'm Max Meyers, the senior producer of a new program called "Options Action," and if the rehearsals are any indication, I think you will find the show both fun and informative.

  • graphic_fast_money.jpg

    SEC chairman Christopher Cox, responding to heavy criticism, said in an interview published on Wednesday he takes pride in his response to the U.S. financial crisis...

  • kfc1.jpg

    Colonel Harland Sanders' handwritten recipe of 11 herbs and spices was to be removed Tuesday from safekeeping at KFC's corporate offices for the first time in decades.

  • graphic_fast_money.jpg

    Melissa Lee has more on the unfolding Merrill Lynch story, with details on its offer to buy back $12B auction rate securities from over 30,000 of its clients, and the ramifications on other Wall Street firms.

  • graphic_fast_money.jpg

    Melissa Lee reports a breaking story linked to Citi's settlement and buyback of auction rate securities during tonight's "Fast Money." In an after-hours announcement, another Wall Street giant, Merrill Lynch, stated it too would buy back auction rate securities from its retail clients, who currently hold $12B of those questionable securities.

  • "[The] stock market: a loser across the board. It was a loser early, it stayed a loser and became a bigger loser as the day went on," Dylan summed up Thursday's trading with that one statement, as AIG and Wal-mart lead the Dow's one-day, 225-point dive. A few lone tech stocks were the only winners in an otherwise distressed market. Adding to the bearish environment was the morning's new jobless claim numbers, the highest reported in several months.