Software Software

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    When Microsoft's earnings came out yesterday, I had to do a double-take because it was hard for me to process just how strong these numbers truly were. I knew the company was poised for a strong quarter, but it was the breadth of its success, and optimistic guidance that took me, and so many investors, by surprise.

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    Microsoft beat estimates with both its earnings and sales numbers, and the company's shares jumped 8 percent in extended trading.

  • Over 30 years this Indian software engineer has helped pioneer outsourcing from the West.  The company he co-founded now receives one and a half million job applications each year. By building Infosys he has contributed to a transformation of India's reputation, stoked controversy and built a personal fortune worth in excess of one billion US dollars.

  • Struggling smart phone maker Palm Inc. will shutter all 34 of its retail stores as the company continues to try to find a financial foothold in a sector of technology seeing unprecedented competition.

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    Microsoft--the world's largest software maker--got a whole lot larger at the end of 2007; the company blowing past Wall Street expectations, and offering up optimistic guidance that could go a long way toward buoying beleaguered equity markets around the world.

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    Microsoft's earnings may be the most anticipated report from the tech sector, and possibly the most anticipated report during the earnings season, and here's why: The company is just as big a deal in this country as it is in Europe, Asia, emerging markets.

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    I'm skeptical, to say the least, of a report originally in the Chinese language Economic Daily News, and now re-printed by Digitimes detailing an iPhone shipment slowdown by Apple. The story says Apple has lowered its projected shipments of iPhones from 2 million units to around 1 million or 1.2 million for its fiscal second quarter ending march 2008.

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    This is the LIVE blog from Tuesday's Apple earnings conference call. Read it for the first time or re-read again. I had fun doing it and I hope you enjoy reading it.

  • eBay is one of the net's four horsemen, ushering in a spate of online earnings after the bell today, and coming a week ahead of Yahoo (next Tuesday); Amazon (next Wednesday); and Google (next Thursday.) So eBay's earnings will put the entire sector under the spotlight.

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    Texas Instruments reports after the bell, and the company will be forced into Apple Inc.'s shadow, which might be a shame. That's because this company could offer up some surprisingly good news, both in wireless and in flat TV's.

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    Just some quick thoughts on what started out as a brutal morning, but is "coming back" a little thanks to the Fed's must-do move minutes ago: I heard from many of you over the weekend, and the tone was a little surprising.

  • Satyam Computer Services, India's fourth-largest software services exporter, on Monday posted a 29 percent rise in quarterly profit, meeting estimates, as it won large outsourcing deals.

  • Apple Inc.'s earnings are always a big-time financial event, but this time, the company's numbers will be followed more closely than ever before. Why? Worries about a recession, concerns over a lackluster holiday shopping season, insecurity about how the company's products are selling.

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    It's not often that I'm thrown for a loop when a company reports earnings. But when the headline number from Advanced Micro Devices crossed the wires as a loss of $3.06 a share, my eyes nearly popped. Where's the charge coming from? What's the problem here? What did we all miss?

  • IBM on Thursday forecast 2008 earnings well ahead of Wall Street expectations after results showing a strong international performance, and its shares jumped 5 percent.

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    I heard a new term the other day. You're probably familiar with it, but it was new to me: Hot Money. It's a reflection of the new kind of market dynamics we're all seeing lately, and the best, fresh example of "hot money" is Advanced Micro Devices.

  • Oracle's headquarters in Redwood City, California.

    Oracle Wednesday won a three-month-long campaign to buy BEA Systems by raising its bid for the business software maker by 14 percent to $8.5 billion.

  • Seems I struck a nerve with some Intel investors reading this morning's post on the company's steep decline following yesterday's earnings. Here's a taste: Bill Jameson writes, "Felt the same way. Nice report."

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    Ouch. There's really no other way to summarize Intel's earnings, and there's little question that Intel's softness took Wall Street by surprise. Just look at the shellacking these shares are taking today. But is the selloff warranted, or -- like so many other moves to the downside in recent weeks among the top names in tech -- is the Intel drubbing overdone?

  • What a crazy day for Apple Inc., Macworld attendees, and me.  Still trying to get the feeling back in my thumbs after live-blogging, via Blackberry, during the keynote.  I really hope you found that useful.

 

  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Ari Levy

    Ari Levy is CNBC.com's senior technology reporter in San Francisco.

  • Harriet Taylor

    Harriet Taylor is a CNBC.com technology reporter based in San Francisco. She covers Apple, Uber and the sharing economy, cyber security and emerging Silicon Valley trends.

  • Julia Boorstin

    Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt

    Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Josh Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

Recode

  • Executive Editor, Recode; Host, Recode Decode podcast; and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.

  • Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large, Recode and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.