Software Software

  • Steve Jobs

    It's either an incredibly elaborate hoax or Apple Inc.'s CEO Steve Jobs is one unhappy camper this morning: It appears notes for his highly anticipated Macworld keynote address may have been leaked onto the internet last night, posting on the popular online encyclopedia web site Wikipedia.

  • techcheck_apple_fundamentals.jpg

    When it comes to Apple Inc. and Wall Street, I don't get it. These last few weeks have seen a precipitous decline in Apple shares, from a high right near $203 to a low of $171. The fall in Apple shares follows a general downdraft in all kinds of tech, yet many experts both in and outside the company I'm talking to have continued to harp on the "fundamentals" that got Apple to those lofty heights to begin with.

  • German software giant SAP posted solid preliminary fourth-quarter results in line with market expectations on Monday, sending its shares up as much as 6 percent.

  • You knew it was coming simply because we all know that stocks, particularly tech stocks, don't move in only one direction despite what we've seen since Jan. 1. It took a stunning IBM pre-announcement to get the ball rolling, and that ball is rolling, fast.

  • macworld.jpg

    It's the Friday before Macworld and once again, tongues are wagging about what Steve Jobs will pull out of his jeans pocket; what he might have lurking up his trademarked black sleeve; whether he can offer up something to pump some life back into this sagging stock.

  • Shares in Swiss-based computer peripherals maker Logitech International gained up to 12 percent on Thursday amid speculation Microsoft would launch a takeover bid, traders said.

  • circuit_city_93x68.jpg

    Some electronics retailers had huge success in 2007, but the year left others bruised. A CES retail panel featured executives from both kinds of companies.

  • Ford shows off its Focus model equipped with "Sync" connectivity, which will be available on nearly all Ford, Lincolns and Mercurys by the end of 2008.

    Ford Motor has signed up some tech heavyweights to help with "Sync," its in-car satellite communications system, With help from Microsoft, Sirius and others, Ford's car of the very near future is something like a GPS, digital music player, cell phone and voice recognition system on wheels.

  • LG Phillips Epaper

    Every year at the Consumer Electronics Show, something jumps out at you as truly extraordinary. And the electronic paper from LG Philips LCD, which I was able to show exclusively this morning on CNBC and MSNBC jumps into that category.

  • Microsoft said on Tuesday it would bid 19 crowns per share for Norwegian Internet search software firm Fast Search & Transfer, valuing the company at about $1.2 billion.

  • CES08_blog_graphic.jpg

    Intel will get in touch with it's "mid" tonight -- as in mobile internet device -- a key initiative that CEO Paul Otellini talked to me about exclusively earlier today.

  • Sony Blu-Ray DVD disc

    David Bishop, worldwide president of Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, won't say outright that his company has won the high-definition DVD war over archrival Toshiba, but he sure talks like someone who thinks he has now that Warner Brothers has opted to go exclusively with its Blu-ray gear

  • xbox_thumb_93x62.jpg

    Here's my TV interview today with Microsoft's Robbie Bach. Bach who is Entertainment & Devices Division president, talks exclusively about Xbox, Zune, iPod, HD DVD vs. Blu-ray and the economy. Take a look as I think you'll find it very interesting. For one thing, he says Xbox is recession proof.

  • CES08_blog_graphic.jpg

    It's been a raucous 24 hours at the Consumer Electronics Show and the show floor hasn't even opened yet. I touched down in Vegas Sunday at 10:45 a.m. after being up all night because of the Northern California storms, and headed straight for the Las Vegas Convention Center so I could put the finishing touches on our story NBC Nightly News.

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    There are two stories I'm looking forward to investigating as the crowds hit the floor Monday. First, there's the state of the struggle between Toshiba, with its HD DVD high-def disc format, and Sony's rival Blu-ray format. Secondly, there's a new batch of electronics that incorporate motion-based controllers similar to Nintendo's Wii.

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    Bill Gates is calling this period in the company's history the dawn of a new digital decade, and his annual, keynote address at CES is chock full of news, both technologically and financially.

  • Sony Playstation 3

    Sony's game console sales figures for the holiday shopping season reached more than 3.9 million units in North America, but Playstation 3 is still well behind Microsoft's Xbox 360.

  • Ergo software screenshot

    Awareness. That's the word CES exhibitors use most when you ask what they hope for out of the show. Everyone turns out all the stops to alert everyone else to their presence—and everyone does it at the same time. That's why "CES Unveiled," a pre-show press event, takes on the air of a Tunisian bazaar or a Chicago futures trading floor

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    George Lucas' video game company is set to unveil two of the most anticipated titles the industry as seen since "Halo 3."  And these games may herald the next generation of films from the legendary producer.

  • Here we are on the eve of the massive Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, a kind of senior prom for the tech industry, when everyone seems to feel really good about themselves and the innovations they're bringing to the market.

 

  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Ari Levy

    Ari Levy is CNBC.com's senior technology reporter in San Francisco.

  • Harriet Taylor

    Harriet Taylor is a CNBC.com technology reporter based in San Francisco. She covers Apple, Uber and the sharing economy, cyber security and emerging Silicon Valley trends.

  • Julia Boorstin

    Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt

    Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Josh Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

Recode

  • Executive Editor, Recode; Host, Recode Decode podcast; and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.

  • Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large, Recode and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.