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Tech Software

  • Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi

    Don't worry about Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi — if this whole politics thing doesn't work out, he's always got a career as a singer to fall back on!

  • Apple Shipment Fears Grow

    Apple shares are down nearly 2% on concerns about demand for the new iPhone. DigiTimes says Apple is telling part suppliers to delay some of their shipments until the early part of next year. What should investors make of this? Peter Misek, Jefferies analyst.

  • cooking-with-tablet-200.jpg

    For many cooks, the pleasure of Thanksgiving is in the planning. In early November, the recipe folders come out, along with dreams of learning to perfect a lattice pie crust, and the cookbooks covered with splatters and sticky notes that evoke holidays past, the New York Times reports.

  • panic-button-200.jpg

    As if we’re not on edge enough, the government is going to push the button for the emergency broadcast system — but just for a second. Everybody remain calm .....

  • Apple Store 5th Ave NY

    Yale professor David Gelernter survived an attack by the Unabomber. Now, he's up against a bigger force: He's suing Apple. After seeing an email from Steve Jobs in the case, one patent law expert said simply, "Wow."

  • Google

    the New York Times reports.

  • sorry-note-200.jpg

    People often joke about how much waiting for the cable guy and other service people is costing them — in time and billable hours. Well now, someone has actually done the math.

  • Ethernet cable connected to laptop computer.

    Cloud computing, on-demand software and social media marketing are providing easier access to previously unaffordable resources.

  • One-Click-200.jpg

    "It's hard to imagine anyone could possibly fill the enormous vacuum left with the tragic death of Steve Jobs. But people are searching hopefully for such a person," and this author thinks that person could be Jeff Bezos.

  • Nest Labs Thermostat

    Tony Fadell, a former Apple executive who led iPod and iPhone development from 2001 to 2009, helped transform consumer products used by millions of people. Next up: the humble household thermostat. The New York Times reports.

  • Computer gamers queue to try out "Battlefield 3"

    There has never been a lot of love lost between Activision and Electronic Arts. The two video game publishers fight over just about everything.

  • Copper Prices Slide

    Losses in copper are adding to negative sentiment on stocks, with the Fast Money traders.

  • Apple Store

    Apple shocked the street by missing analyst estimates as iPhone sales disappointed the financial prognosticators. But rather than providing an indication of Apple's decline, it instead highlights how easily influenced the investment community can be, caught up in momentum, and prone to setting unreasonable expectations for earnings estimates.

  • The forward march of technology is both unforgiving and unstoppable. As it mercilessly weeds out the old in favor of the new, once beloved products and services become less favored by consumers, while others simply become obsolete.It’s always been this way. The horse and buggy was once the dominant means of travel for Americans, but once the automobile was invented formerly solvent buggy makers found themselves out of a job.This dynamic repeats itself whenever a new invention comes along that si

    What follows is a list of products and services that became so indispensable to consumers that they instantly lost interest in their previous favorites.

  • Apple's Senior Vice President of iOS Scott Forstall speaks about the new greeting card app at the event introducing the new iPhone 4s at the company's headquarters October 4, 2011 in Cupertino, California. The announcement marks the first time new CEO Tim Cook introduced a new product since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs resigned in August.

    Within the new iPhone lies a very special element that heralds the next generation in smartphones. This element could have a titanic effect on mobile commerce in the months to come and, overall, points to a much larger trend for which few can even begin to fully define its future business impact.

  • cell phone light

    Today, the fundamentals of the concert experience – hearing about a show, rallying your friends to buy tickets, going to the show, and recounting the experience to everyone you know – are the same, but the means are greatly modernized through mobile technology.

  • Apple Store

    Brian Sullivan’s opinion piece on Wednesday detailed why he’d likely avoid the new iCloud service, saying it was too expensive to justify the benefits. Today, he admits he blew it on Apple.

  • Great Tech War of 2012

    From Apple to Amazon to Facebook, each tech titan is pushing further into mobile, tablets, apps, cloud data and beyond. Robert Safian, Fast Company, and CNBC's Jon Fortt discuss.

  • For the past dozen years or so, Hollywood has leaned on classic (and not so classic) TV shows as the source catalog for new films. As that trend comes to a close, studios are focusing more and more on the videogame industry.

  • Education

    Because a child’s identity is pristine and often remains unchecked for more than a decade, it is uniquely desirable to identity thieves. Just as appealing to criminals is the fact that a Social Security number with a clean history can be attached to any name or date of birth.

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