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  • watching_tv_200.jpg

    It used to be that a basic $25-a-month phone bill was your main telecommunications expense. But by 2004, the average American spent $770.95 annually on services like cable television, Internet connectivity and video games, according to data from the Census Bureau. By 2008, that number rose to $903, outstripping inflation. By the end of this year, it is expected to have grown to $997.07. Add another $1,000 or more for cellphone service and the average family is spending as much on entertainment over devices as they are on dining out or buying gasoline.

  • The news from Electronic Arts bordered on dismal for the company's third fiscal quarter, but the outlook is downright depressing for those investors long in these shares.

  • How much of a threat is the global fear factor and how can investors play it? Tobias Levkovich, chief U.S. equity strategist at Citigroup, shared his insights.

  • Electronic Arts Headquarters, Redwood City, California

    It's no secret Electronic Arts has been feeling some pressure lately. And when the company reports its third quarter tonight after the bell, we'll get the best indication yet as to just how tough times have gotten for the world's biggest game publisher.

  • It’s fitting that the first CEO to start a blog is also the first CEO to quit via Twitter. Not one to rest on a single act of digital trailblazing, he also made it a haiku!

  • New iPod Nano

    With the Grammys coming Sunday, and Apple's big iPad release just a few days old, it's a good opportunity to take a look at just how far digital music has come, and what a big role Apple has played in all this.

  • Apple's iPhone

    Apple's App Store might be one of the greatest entrepreneurial tools the world has ever seen. Nothing virtual about this gold rush. Consider what Steve Jobs told us last week: 140,000 apps, and over 3 billion downloads. Think, i-KaChing.

  • Wii

    The music industry was almost killed — and ultimately saved — by it. The home video industry is growing because of it. But when it comes to video games, digital distribution is not really making much of an impact.

  • Microsoft

    Look no further than the Windows 7 upgrade cycle, courtesy of retail sales, for the real strength behind this story.

  • Microsoft sits in the sweet spot of global economic recovery, but this company still has to outperform Street expectations in order for this stock to really work. At least that's the word from several analysts I'm talking to ahead of the company's second fiscal quarter earnings later today.

  • Workers apply the Apple logo to the exterior of the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in preparation for an Apple special event January 26, 2010 in San Francisco, California.

    With the widely anticipated introduction of a tablet computer at an event here on Wednesday morning, Apple may be giving the media industry a kind of time machine — a chance to undo mistakes of the past.

  • Later tonight we'll get Yahoo's fourth quarter numbers, and if you're using Google's blockbuster report from last week as a kind of barometer to handicap Yahoo, that may not be such a good idea, and here's why.

  • Apple's iPhone 3Gs

    Apple’s move to open up the iPhone to outside programmers in 2008 started a software-writing frenzy. Giant companies and bedroom tinkerers alike rushed to get their applications into the App Store and onto the phone’s 3.5-inch touch screen.

  • Earlier this morning, Electronic Arts announced that it was opening up the beta to its Tiger Woods PGA Tour Online game. The company also announced that it would go through with a console title with Tiger Woods as its lead endorser this summer. We sat down with EA Sports president Peter Moore to see why the company made these decisions.

  • computer_password_200.jpg

    According to a new analysis, one out of five Web users still decides to leave the digital equivalent of a key under the doormat: they choose a simple, easily guessed password like “abc123,” “iloveyou” or even “password” to protect their data. The NYT reports.

  • my_town_200.jpg

    As the iPhone has become a more powerful force in the video game industry, it's not just customers that Apple is stealing away. More and more developers are switching allegiances as well.

  • lock_laptop.jpg

    If hackers could steal the source codes of technology companies like Google or Cisco, they could essentially give themselves secret access to everything the company and its customers did with the software. The NYT reports.

  • Modern Warfare 2

    The video game industry was down 8 percent compared to the 2008 sales numbers, with sales of $19.7 billion. It was the first time since 2002 that video game companies as a whole have posted notable negative growth.

  • Dow component Intel will be reporting quarterly earnings after the closing bell today. What should investors expect from the tech giant? Craig Berger, senior semiconductor analyst at FBR Capital Markets, shared his insight.

  • The Google Nexus One

    Google’s celebrated algorithms may power the Web’s most popular search engine, but they have not yet been programmed to answer a call when a customer has a problem. The NYT reports.

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  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Ari Levy

    Ari Levy is CNBC.com's senior technology reporter in San Francisco.

  • Harriet Taylor

    Harriet Taylor is a CNBC.com technology reporter based in San Francisco. She covers Apple, Uber and the sharing economy, cyber security and emerging Silicon Valley trends.

  • Julia Boorstin

    Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt

    Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Josh Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

Recode

  • Executive Editor, Recode; Host, Recode Decode podcast; and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.

  • Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large, Recode and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.