Technology Software

More

  • Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, California.

    This was going to be a dicey quarter no matter how you slice it for Intel, with analysts anticipating a paltry 2 cents a share in earnings and the very real possibility that the company could report its first loss in something like 87 quarters.

  • EA_logo.jpg

    Will Wright, the creative force behind some of Electronic Arts’ biggest games, has announced plans to leave the company, the latest in a series of obstacles for the one-time publishing king of the video game space.

  • hollywood_sign_AP.jpg

    In a case of piracy that some analysts called unprecedented, untold thousands of people watched a version of “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” online Wednesday, a full month before its scheduled theater release, the New York Times reported.

  • Sheesh, suggest for a moment that Microsoft might have a winning message to deliver and wow does that burn you guys up!

  • For the first time, Microsoft is aggressively going after Apple in a new advertising campaign that will try to undo the damage it suffered from Apple's "I'm a Mac/I'm a PC" ads, from which Microsoft is still trying to recover.

  • google_logo2.jpg

    It was just a couple of months ago that Google confirmed that it would be cutting 100 employee recruiters, its first layoffs, and so symbolic in the wake of the nearly 14,000 workers the company has hired over just the past three years.

  • Oracle's headquarters in Redwood City, California.

    Oracle reported a profit and sales that surpassed Wall Street's expectations, and shares of the business software company popped more than 7 percent after hours. Oracle also declared its first-ever dividend.

  • apple_logo_new_1.jpg

    It looks like Apple will be updating its iPhone operating system with the company scheduling an event on St. Patrick's Day next week. But the event itself might be more newsworthy than you think, especially given the current climate in Cupertino.

  • Apple's new line of Macs unveiled today signal an incremental "refresh" of the aging line of computers, but was hardly the redesign some Macophiles were hoping for.

  • Technical Workers in Clean Room

    The company's fourth quarter earnings report is particularly devastating since the company comes up way short as far as Wall Street expectations are concerned, even though analysts have been falling all over each other over the past week to lower estimates.

  • dell_200.jpg

    Dell will release its fourth quarter earnings after the bell tonight, and despite some draconian cost cuts and a rock-bottom share price, it is an unattractive investment. And will be for the foreseeable future.

  • Apple will not be streaming the event to its website, a restriction it has historically used. Nor, I'm told, will Apple allow any communication devices into the event so those of us trying to cover it can live blog. No Blackberrys. No iPhones. No laptops of any kind.

  • For the first time since returning to Apple's C-suite back in 1997, Steve Jobs will not preside over the company's annual shareholder meeting which begins later this morning at 10am PST.

  • intel_logo_new.jpg

    I just got finished speaking with Paul Otellini, Intel's CEO, about his company's massive expansion plans, announced earlier today, and he tells me while his news wasn't enough to turn red ink into black on Wall Street, it did bring a smile to the face of at least one person.

  • Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, California.

    Anyone who has covered Intel during its 41-year history knows the company's strategy during tough economic times: You gotta spend money to make money, with today's announcement, Paul Otellini set a new standard.

  • NetApp is seeing huge call volume Monday, ahead of its quarterly report Wednesday after the close. ... NTAP was above $26 in September, but bottomed at $10.39 in early November. Since then the data storage company has steadily climbed; at one point today the shares reached $16.74 after a Barron's article called the company recession-resistant.

  • cisco_systems_sign_3.jpg

    There may be a method to Cisco's madness when it comes to earnings announcements, and not running with the pack. The company reports after the bell tonight, and comes two weeks after the flood of tech earnings began.

  • Tech Jobs

    Challenger, Gray & Christmas reported today the pace of tech industry job cuts jumped 167 percent in the second half of 2008, with computer, electronics and telecom firms slashing 186,995 jobs in 2008. It's the highest total since the 228,325 job cuts in 2003. And January is shaping up to be equally brutal.

  • Kris_Gopalakrishnan_200x150.jpg

    Infosys CEO Kris Gopalakrishnan is guest blogging for CNBC.com at WEF. Here are some of his thoughts he related to us as the event gets underway, including what he hopes to see from the sessions, what his company discloses on banks and what he hopes to see at the buffet table.

  • Ben-Verwaayen_93X70.jpg

    Alcatel-Lucent CEO Ben Verwaayen is guest blogging for CNBC.com. Here are some of his thoughts related to us on the first day at Davos, including the shift from chit-chat to note- taking, the presence of Russia and China and if executives really travel here touting cost cuts.

Contact Software

  • CNBC NEWSLETTERS

    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    Get these newsletters delivered to your inbox, and more info about about our products and service. Privacy Policy.

 

  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Ari Levy

    Ari Levy is CNBC.com's senior technology reporter in San Francisco.

  • Harriet Taylor

    Harriet Taylor is a CNBC.com technology reporter based in San Francisco. She covers Apple, Uber and the sharing economy, cyber security and emerging Silicon Valley trends.

  • Julia Boorstin

    Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt

    Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Josh Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

Recode

  • Executive Editor, Recode; Host, Recode Decode podcast; and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.

  • Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large, Recode and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.