Technology Software

  • Later tonight we'll get Yahoo's fourth quarter numbers, and if you're using Google's blockbuster report from last week as a kind of barometer to handicap Yahoo, that may not be such a good idea, and here's why.

  • Apple's iPhone 3Gs

    Apple’s move to open up the iPhone to outside programmers in 2008 started a software-writing frenzy. Giant companies and bedroom tinkerers alike rushed to get their applications into the App Store and onto the phone’s 3.5-inch touch screen.

  • Earlier this morning, Electronic Arts announced that it was opening up the beta to its Tiger Woods PGA Tour Online game. The company also announced that it would go through with a console title with Tiger Woods as its lead endorser this summer. We sat down with EA Sports president Peter Moore to see why the company made these decisions.

  • computer_password_200.jpg

    According to a new analysis, one out of five Web users still decides to leave the digital equivalent of a key under the doormat: they choose a simple, easily guessed password like “abc123,” “iloveyou” or even “password” to protect their data. The NYT reports.

  • my_town_200.jpg

    As the iPhone has become a more powerful force in the video game industry, it's not just customers that Apple is stealing away. More and more developers are switching allegiances as well.

  • lock_laptop.jpg

    If hackers could steal the source codes of technology companies like Google or Cisco, they could essentially give themselves secret access to everything the company and its customers did with the software. The NYT reports.

  • Modern Warfare 2

    The video game industry was down 8 percent compared to the 2008 sales numbers, with sales of $19.7 billion. It was the first time since 2002 that video game companies as a whole have posted notable negative growth.

  • Dow component Intel will be reporting quarterly earnings after the closing bell today. What should investors expect from the tech giant? Craig Berger, senior semiconductor analyst at FBR Capital Markets, shared his insight.

  • The Google Nexus One

    Google’s celebrated algorithms may power the Web’s most popular search engine, but they have not yet been programmed to answer a call when a customer has a problem. The NYT reports.

  • The U.S. and global technology market will continue to grow in 2010, said Andrew Bartels, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research. He shared his sector outlook.

  • medal_of_honor_200.jpg

    The game publisher, which has been attempting a turnaround for nearly two years, on Monday warned that its earnings for the December quarter would be significantly lower than expected. Shares, predictably, are under fire today, down nearly 8 percent.

  • remoteLess_videoGame_200.jpg

    The technology industry is going retro — moving away from remote controls, mice and joysticks to something that arrives without batteries, wires or a user manual. It’s called a hand. The NYT explains.

  • Ford Sync

    If it's not already apparent, we are quickly heading towards a day when our car will be fully "wired" into our lives and that connectivity opens up a host of opportunities and problems.

  • remote_100.jpg

    The life span of  the couch potato's magic wand may be drawing to a close, with the dawn of 3D gesture-recognition devices. e the couch potato's magic wand may be drawing to a close, with the dawn of 3D gesture-recognition devices.

  • Google Nexus One

    This was a live blog from Jim Goldman who attended a news conference at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California where the company unveiled its smartphone, Nexus One.

  • Leaked Image taken of Nexus One by Google.

    Google’s expected unveiling on Tuesday of a rival to the iPhone is part of its careful plan to try to do what few other technology companies have done before: retain its leadership as computing shifts from one generation to the next. The New York Times reports.

  • Welcome to Las Vegas Sign

    On a recent Sunday in the sports book at the M Resort in nearby Henderson, gamblers seeking action on professional and college football games were engaging in a much different ritual: betting through hand-held devices no larger than a smartphone.

  • The_Bigs_game1_200.jpg

    It’s obvious that the company is never going to earn its letterman’s jacket, so perhaps the time has come for it to walk away from the sports category.

  • Hewlett Packard

    If you haven't seen the video on youtube yet, it's worth a look. If this is legit, it's brutal, and Hewlett-Packard , the world's largest personal computer maker, has some major explaining to do.

  • Carl Icahn

    Carl Icahn and Take Two Interactive Software are hardly strangers.  The investor raised eyebrows Thursday after reporting an 11.3 percent stake in the video game publisher. Given his activist shareholder history, some took that as a sign that Take Two would soon be back on the sales block.

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  • Matt Hunter is the senior technology editor at CNBC.com.

  • Ari Levy

    Ari Levy is CNBC.com's senior technology reporter in San Francisco.

  • Harriet Taylor

    Harriet Taylor is a CNBC.com technology reporter based in San Francisco. She covers Apple, Uber and the sharing economy, cyber security and emerging Silicon Valley trends.

  • Julia Boorstin

    Working from Los Angeles, Boorstin is CNBC's media and entertainment reporter and editor of CNBC.com's Media Money section.

  • Jon Fortt

    Jon Fortt is an on-air editor. He covers the companies, start-ups, and trends that are driving innovation in the industry.

  • Josh Lipton is CNBC's technology correspondent, working from CNBC's Silicon Valley bureau.

Recode

  • Executive Editor, Recode; Host, Recode Decode podcast; and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.

  • Co-Founder and Editor-at-Large, Recode and Co-Executive Producer, Code Conference. Re/code is part of the CNBC network.