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Asia Top News and Analysis South Korea

  • Shares in Europe's largest shipbuilder, Aker Yards, soared more than 20 percent on Monday after South Korea industrial group STX bought a 4.3 billion kroner ($796 million; 558 million euros) stake in the Oslo-based company.

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    Asian stocks closed higher Tuesday, reversing two straight sessions of declines. But Japan finished almost unchanged on lingering worries about high oil prices and the full impact of the U.S. housing slump on its economy.

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    Asian markets closed lower Monday, but pared back heavy losses suffered in the morning session and India's Sensex eked out a slight gain. Japan ended 2.2 percent lower while South Korea dropped 3.3 percent. 

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    Asian markets finished red across the board Friday with financial stocks taking the worst of the beating as investors sold bank shares on credit concerns. Japan and South Korea both closed 1.7 percent lower, while Australia finished just shy of 1 percent down.

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    A rebound in banks and technology shares helped drive many Asian markets to a higher close Thursday, but speculation over the future of the Indian Prime Minister caused the Bombay Sensex to slump late in the session.

  • A stockbroker watches his terminal during trading in Bombay, India, Thursday, May 18, 2006. Indian shares plunged Thursday, with the benchmark stock index tumbling 6.8 percent, or more than 800 points, its biggest point drop ever, largely on fears of higher taxes on foreign funds that invest in Indian stocks. (AP Photo/Rajesh Nirgude)

    Asian stocks ended in negative territory Wednesday, following Wall Street's decline after disappointing earnings from big U.S. banks while record crude prices fueled concerns about the outlook for corporate profits.

  • The markets traded mostly lower in Asia as bank stocks were battered across the board, but a surge in crude oil prices powered energy stocks on expectations that record high oil prices would boost profits.

  • Several Asian markets raced ahead to rack up record gains at the start of the week. China's Shanghai Composite Index closed 2.2% higher as investors piled into oil stocks such as Sinopec following fresh highs for the commodity. 

  • Asian stocks ended the week in negative territory, pulling back from record highs after a weeklong rally.

  • After a brief pause in the morning session, Asian stocks regained momentum to extend their record run in the afternoon and close higher across the board. Markets in Hong Kong, Australia and South Korea all touched lifetime highs.

  • South Korea's central bank held interest rates steady on Thursday, as expected, in the face of  risk from turbulent global financial markets and despite data bolstering the case for further monetary tightening.

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    Asian markets closed broadly higher Wednesday, having been cheered by a rally on Wall Street the previous day after the Federal Open Market Committee's meeting minutes revealed a unanimous decision to cut US interest rates.

  • Asian markets swung back into positive territory to close higher Tuesday with Australia setting a new record and South Korea finishing almost flat after an erratic session with stocks see-sawing.

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    Asian markets finished mixed Monday, with South Korea closing at a new record high while China closed having reached record intra-day peaks. Trading volume was thin with Japanese markets closed for a one-day holiday.

  • Asian stocks had a mixed end to the week as many investors stayed out of the market in the run-up to the U.S. jobs data due later Friday. Japanese, South Korean and Taiwanese stocks were weaker, but the Heng Seng enjoyed a late-session rally.

  • A man uses his mobile phone in front of electronic stock boards at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX Ltd.) headquarters in Sydney, Australia.

    Asian stocks finished mostly lower Thursday as losses in the chip sector pulled the major indexes into the red, following a negative report on Intel.

  • South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun, right, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, left, inspect honor guard at welcoming ceremony in Pyongyang, North Korea, Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2007. North Korean leader Kim Jong Il greeted South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun in Pyongyang on Tuesday to begin the second summit between the two countries since the peninsula's division after World War II. (AP Photo/ Korea Pool via Yonhap)

    The leaders of North and South Korea pledged on Thursday to bring peace to the Cold War's last frontier by seeking talks with China and the United States to formally end the 1950-1953 Korean War.

  • Asian stocks finished mixed Wednesday following a late-session decline in Hong Kong and Singapore as investors took profits in the wake of a two-day rally.

  • South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun, right, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, left, inspect honor guard at welcoming ceremony in Pyongyang, North Korea, Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2007. North Korean leader Kim Jong Il greeted South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun in Pyongyang on Tuesday to begin the second summit between the two countries since the peninsula's division after World War II. (AP Photo/ Korea Pool via Yonhap)

    The leaders of the Koreas got down to talks on Wednesday after a cool start to a summit between two countries divided by decades of animosity, but news of a deal on unwinding Pyongyang's nuclear arms program could lift the mood.

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    Asian markets finished higher across the board Tuesday, with Hong Kong, Australia, Singapore and South Korea in record-breaking territory lifted by financial companies after big banks, including Citigroup, set out their losses from subprime crisis, raising hopes that the worst may be over.