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Asia Top News and Analysis South Korea

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    Warren Buffett is in South Korea for his first-ever visit to that country.  He's telling reporters there that valuations on South Korea stocks are generally good.  Buffett remains negative, however, on the U.S. dollar and predicts subprime problems will be affecting the U.S. consumer for up to another two years.

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    Becky Quick is ready for her whirlwind trip to Asia with Warren Buffett. I just ran into her in the hallway and she tells me she's leaving for Omaha in just a few minutes.  Earlier this morning, she previewed the voyage on CNBC's Squawk Box, which she co-anchors, and which will be featuring her TV reports from the road.  Here's the video clip and a transcript.

  • On the eve of an Asian trip that will include his first-ever visit to South Korea, Warren Buffett says the stock market there generally looks good, despite big price gains in recent years.

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    CNBC's Becky Quick will be traveling to Asia with Warren Buffett next week.  Exclusive reports on CNBC and here on CNBC.com's Warren Buffett Watch.

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    After several years of buying South Korean stocks, Warren Buffett will be making his first visit to the country later this month.

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    CNBC's Becky Quick reported live by phone a few minutes ago from Warren Buffett's private jet, heading to a refueling stop in Anchorage and then on to China. WWarren then came on the line to 'duck' a question from Mark Haines on currencies.  Here's the video clip and transcript from Squawk on the Street.

  • A man uses his mobile phone in front of electronic stock boards at the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX Ltd.) headquarters in Sydney, Australia.

    Asian markets rallied in the afternoon session Friday, ending the week higher as upbeat profits results from companies such as Sony gave stocks a boost.  Japan and Australia both finished over 1 percent higher, while South Korea advanced 2.6 percent.

  • Asian markets finished mixed Thursday with financial stocks taking a hit while strong Chinese economic data raised investors' concern over the prospects of further monetary tightening. The Shanghai Composite sank 4.8 percent, but South Korea closed over 2 percent higher.

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    Most of the major Asian indexes closed in the red Wednesday on reports that Merrill Lynch is expected to announce bigger-than-expected third-quarter losses. Japan, South Korea and Australia all closed lower. All three indexes fell sharply midway through the session after spending most of the morning in positive territory.

  • Shares in Europe's largest shipbuilder, Aker Yards, soared more than 20 percent on Monday after South Korea industrial group STX bought a 4.3 billion kroner ($796 million; 558 million euros) stake in the Oslo-based company.

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    Asian stocks closed higher Tuesday, reversing two straight sessions of declines. But Japan finished almost unchanged on lingering worries about high oil prices and the full impact of the U.S. housing slump on its economy.

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    Asian markets closed lower Monday, but pared back heavy losses suffered in the morning session and India's Sensex eked out a slight gain. Japan ended 2.2 percent lower while South Korea dropped 3.3 percent. 

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    Asian markets finished red across the board Friday with financial stocks taking the worst of the beating as investors sold bank shares on credit concerns. Japan and South Korea both closed 1.7 percent lower, while Australia finished just shy of 1 percent down.

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    A rebound in banks and technology shares helped drive many Asian markets to a higher close Thursday, but speculation over the future of the Indian Prime Minister caused the Bombay Sensex to slump late in the session.

  • A stockbroker watches his terminal during trading in Bombay, India, Thursday, May 18, 2006. Indian shares plunged Thursday, with the benchmark stock index tumbling 6.8 percent, or more than 800 points, its biggest point drop ever, largely on fears of higher taxes on foreign funds that invest in Indian stocks. (AP Photo/Rajesh Nirgude)

    Asian stocks ended in negative territory Wednesday, following Wall Street's decline after disappointing earnings from big U.S. banks while record crude prices fueled concerns about the outlook for corporate profits.

  • The markets traded mostly lower in Asia as bank stocks were battered across the board, but a surge in crude oil prices powered energy stocks on expectations that record high oil prices would boost profits.

  • Several Asian markets raced ahead to rack up record gains at the start of the week. China's Shanghai Composite Index closed 2.2% higher as investors piled into oil stocks such as Sinopec following fresh highs for the commodity. 

  • Asian stocks ended the week in negative territory, pulling back from record highs after a weeklong rally.

  • After a brief pause in the morning session, Asian stocks regained momentum to extend their record run in the afternoon and close higher across the board. Markets in Hong Kong, Australia and South Korea all touched lifetime highs.

  • South Korea's central bank held interest rates steady on Thursday, as expected, in the face of  risk from turbulent global financial markets and despite data bolstering the case for further monetary tightening.