Agricultural Commodities Soy Meal Commodity Trades, Charts

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  • CHICAGO, Feb 18- Chicago Board of Trade wheat futures fell more than 1 percent on Thursday, setting back from a two-session rally as traders returned their focus to record-large global inventories and poor export demand for U.S. supplies, traders said. At the CBOT as of 1:01 p.m. CST, March wheat was down 5-3/ 4 cents at $4.62-3/ 4 a bushel. March corn was down 1 cent at...

  • CHICAGO, Feb 4- Wheat futures on the Chicago Board of Trade fell more than 1 percent on Thursday on disappointing U.S. export sales data, traders said. March corn was down 2 cents at $3.69 per bushel and March soybeans were down 2-3/ 4 cents at $8.74 a bushel. "The problem is, no matter what you look at, we've got plenty of everything," said Roy Huckabay with the Linn Group, a...

  • *Egypt cancels wheat tender amid wrangling over import terms. At the Chicago Board of Trade as of 12:12 p.m CST, the March soybean contract was up 4-1/ 2 cents at $8.85-1/ 4 per bushel after reaching $8.89-1/ 2, its highest since Dec. 22. March corn was up 1/ 2 cent at $3.71-3/ 4 a bushel after touching $3.73-3/ 4, its highest since Dec. 22.

  • *Soy, corn down as Argentina weather forecasts improve. Corn and soybeans also fell as macroeconomic worries hung over the market and on some forecasts for much-needed rains in Argentina next week. At the Chicago Board of Trade, March wheat ended 4 cents lower at $4.75-1/ 4 per bushel.

  • *Soy, corn down as Argentina weather forecasts improve. Corn and soybeans also fell as macroeconomic worries hung over the market and on some forecasts for much-needed rains in Argentina next week. "The bottom line is, world competition for wheat continues to be pretty stiff, and we are not getting any," said Tom Fritz, a partner with EFG Group in Chicago.

  • A shipload of shredded soya is unloaded via a suction pipe.

    Chinese importers' defaults on soybean cargos may spur debt concerns, but such defaults aren't unusual and China's soybean business has been struggling.

  • Beef has never been more expensive, and rarely more controversial. From top-end T-bone to Big Mac, the future of the beef industry is at stake.

  • Speculators Still Short Commodities

    Greg Smith, Group CEO, Global Commodities Ltd says that speculators are still short commodities and that investors are not picking up on the protein theme yet.

  • Soybean crop

    A Chinese trade delegation signed agreements with U.S. grain companies on Wednesday to buy 8.62 million metric tons of soybeans from the United States and will ink more deals on Thursday for a record-setting purchase topping 12 million metric tons.