Agricultural Commodities Soy Meal Commodity Trades, Charts

  • *Steep decline in China's commodity markets weighs. *Soybeans on track for 5th week of gains, up 3 pct on USDA f'cast. SINGAPORE, May 13- Chicago soybeans slid for a third consecutive session on Friday with poor U.S. weekly export data adding pressure on prices but the market is poised for a fifth week of gains, underpinned by forecasts of tighter supplies.

  • CHICAGO, May 12- U.S. soybean futures fell on Thursday on disappointing weekly export data and expectations that U.S. farmers might increase soybean seedings this spring and plant less corn, analysts said. At the Chicago Board of Trade as of 12:48 p.m. CDT, July soybeans were down 12 cents at $10.66-1/ 4 per bushel. July corn was up 7-1/ 2 cents at $3.85 a bushel and July...

  • *Dalian exchange says to set maximum open interest limit. *Dalian soymeal, Zhengzhou rapeseed meal stretch big gains. The action was on top of higher trading fees and other measures that Dalian and commodity platforms in Shanghai and Zhengzhou have imposed since late April.

  • *Dalian exchange says to set maximum open interest limit. *Dalian soymeal, Zhengzhou rapeseed meal stretch big gains. The action was on top of higher trading fees and other measures that Dalian and commodity platforms in Shanghai and Zhengzhou have imposed since late April.

  • *Soybeans pause one day after blockbuster USDA stocks data. At the Chicago Board of Trade, July soybeans settled down 5-3/ 4 cents at $10.78-1/ 4 per bushel. July corn fell 3-1/ 2 cents to $3.77-1/ 2 a bushel and July wheat ended down 2-1/ 4 cents at $4.59 a bushel.

  • *Soybeans pause one day after blockbuster USDA stocks data. At the Chicago Board of Trade as of 12:08 p.m. CDT, July soybeans were down 7-1/ 2 cents at $10.76-1/ 2 per bushel. July corn fell 5 cents to $3.76 a bushel and July wheat slipped 3 cents to $4.58-1/ 4 a bushel.

  • *USDA sees rising U.S. soy exports trimming 2016/ 17 stocks. At the Chicago Board of Trade as of 1:03 p.m. CDT, most-active July soybean futures were up 57-1/ 2 cents at $10.84 per bushel. The market surged after the USDA, its first supply/demand forecasts for the 2016/ 17 marketing year, projected U.S. soybean ending stocks at 305 million bushels, below an average of...

  • *Analysts expect USDA to project rising U.S. corn stocks. At the Chicago Board of Trade, most-active July corn settled down 8-1/ 2 cents at $3.69 per bushel after dipping to $3.68-1/ 4, its lowest since April 13. Analysts surveyed by Reuters expect the USDA to project U.S. corn stocks will balloon above 2.2 billion bushels by the end of 2016/ 17, which would be the most...

  • In the first three months of the year, Argentina exported 19.97 million tonnes of farm products versus 11.91 million in the first quarter of 2015, the government said in a statement. Free-markets proponent Mauricio Macri took office as president in December, promptly ditching the trade and currency controls applied by his leftist predecessor Cristina...

  • BUENOS AIRES, April 27- A third of Argentina's soy farms remain swamped after early April storms, with crop loss estimates at 5 million tonnes as harvesting starts in areas dry enough to support the 30- tonne carbines used to bring in the beans, experts said on Wednesday. The weather is improving, but big importers like China are already looking to the Midwest to...

  • CBOT May wheat jumped 13-1/ 2 cents to $4.86-1/ 4 per bushel, its highest since Feb. 4. Soybeans for May delivery surged about 3 percent, or 31-1/ 4 cents, to $9.85-1/ 2 per bushel, the highest since Aug. 10. Rains this month in Argentina slowed the soybean harvest and delayed export shipments, prompting some traders to extend long soybean bets.

  • CBOT May wheat jumped 11-1/ 4 cents to $4.84 per bushel, its highest since Feb. 2. Soybeans for May delivery gained 2.1 percent, or 20-1/ 4 cents, to $9.74-1/ 2 per bushel, highest since Aug. 11. CBOT May corn rose 2 cents at $3.83 per bushel as of 12:05 p.m. CDT, below their five-month high of $3.86 reached earlier in the session.

  • *Corn up on uncertain summer weather, dryness in Brazil. CHICAGO, April 15- U.S. corn futures hit a four-month high on Friday as concern about summer weather risk in the Midwest and dry conditions in Brazil prompted investors to cover short positions, analysts said. At the Chicago Board of Trade as of 1 p.m. CDT, May corn was up 5-1/ 2 cents at $3.79-1/ 2 per bushel after...

  • CHICAGO, April 14- U.S. soybean futures fell nearly 1 percent on Thursday on profit-taking and softening cash markets following a four-session advance that lifted the spot May contract to an eight-month high, traders said. But corn settled modestly higher, supported by stronger-than-expected weekly U.S. export sales and worries about dry weather in Brazil.

  • *Soy to 8- month high on China demand, Argentina rains. Soybean futures also charged higher, buoyed by chart-based buying and data showing strong demand from China, while wheat followed the firm trend. At the Chicago Board of Trade, May corn settled up 10-3/ 4 cents at $3.73-1/ 2 per bushel after reaching $3.74-3/ 4, the highest spot price since December.

  • *Soy to 8- month high on China demand, Argentina rains. Wheat and soybeans also charged higher, with soy buoyed by chart-based buying and data showing strong demand from China. At the Chicago Board of Trade as of 12:30 p.m. CDT, May corn was up 9-1/ 4 cents at $3.72 per bushel after reaching $3.74-3/ 4, the highest for a most-active contract since Dec. 21.

  • *USDA trims domestic soybean inventories. "It's a report with no new bullish news and it's a market that's mature here at the top," said Don Roose, president of Iowa- based broker U.S. Commodities. Most-active May corn gained 6 cents to $3.62-3/ 4 a bushel, and May wheat rose 5-1/ 4 cents to $4.52-1/ 2 a bushel at the CBOT.

  • A shipload of shredded soya is unloaded via a suction pipe.

    Chinese importers' defaults on soybean cargos may spur debt concerns, but such defaults aren't unusual and China's soybean business has been struggling.

  • Beef has never been more expensive, and rarely more controversial. From top-end T-bone to Big Mac, the future of the beef industry is at stake.

  • Speculators Still Short Commodities

    Greg Smith, Group CEO, Global Commodities Ltd says that speculators are still short commodities and that investors are not picking up on the protein theme yet.