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  • The U.S. government's plan to inject $20 billion into Citigroup seemed to drive a stock market rally Monday — but failed to reassure analysts overall. CNBC canvassed the experts for their outlooks: Despite the uncertainty, one strategist says financials will lead the recovery — and another sees hyperinflation as the real danger ahead.

  • Options traders are showing bullish activity today in Nucor, the U.S.' largest recycler of steel scrap, which is down 70 percent from its summertime high. So what does this mean for you?

  • The U.S. government's plan to inject $20 billion into Citigroup failed to fully reassure analysts about financials. So what is safe to invest in now? Tim Harris at JPMorgan Asset Management and Khiem Do at Baring Asset Management offered their sector strategies to CNBC.

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    Warren Buffett tells Bloomberg today that more information about Berkshire Hathaway's derivative positions will be included in the company's annual report early next year.   In an email sent by his assistant, Buffett says investors will be told about "all aspects of valuation" for the contracts. In addition, the report will discuss "deficiencies in the formula" for pricing the derivatives, "which we nevertheless use."

  • Pulte Homes plunged to a new multi-year low today, after our OptionMonster's tracking systems showed strong institutional put buying yesterday. Our puts becamse that much more valuable....

  • Chaos reigns Friday: Lame-duck White House and Congress are unable to reach a decision on the financial crisis. Yet Citigroup stock inched up, despite misgivings over the CEO's determination not to break up the firm. And while legislators dither over the jet-setting Big 3 automakers' fates, one strategist told CNBC that Ford Motor stock could yet quadruple overnight. (You read that correctly.)

  • Banks are anathema to stock-market investors now, but Peter Sorrentino of Huntington Asset Advisors says that will change — probably around the middle of next year.

  • China, the emerging economy with so much promise, has often been criticized as a bubble waiting to burst.  Well, it turns out that the U.S., Europe, Australia and the entire global economy was in the same bubble bath that's turned cold.  And while China may not be hot, it certainly is faring better than the U.S..

  • Motorola has had about as much good news as I've got hair: The company is losing market share every day, and its commoditized business is under attack by Samsung, LG, Nokia, and HTC. But as bad as things are, MOT shares may be worth a look now...

  • Volatility in financial stocks, particularly Citigroup and Merrill Lynch, remains very high, according to Rebecca Darst, equity options analyst with TheStreet.com.

  • Telcos, pharmas and some media stocks present investment opportunities now, according to Fergus O'Sullivan, managing director at Morgan Stanley.

  • Richard Sparks of Schaeffer's Investment Research admits the current market environment is a tough one, but he still has some suggestions about where a stock investor's money should go.

  • Car sales are off a cliff, financials are drowning in red ink, and retailers are facing the worst holiday-shopping season in recent memory. So what isn't a disaster?  Howard Rubel of Jefferies & Co. points investors toward defense companies.

  • The rules for investing in technology have changed as much as the markets themselves. Weiss Capital's Mike Burnick and Fort Pitt Capital's Kim Caughey offered CNBC their tech stock picks — and pans. (Part One)

  • The rules for investing in technology have changed as much as the markets themselves. Weiss Capital's Mike Burnick and Fort Pitt Capital's Kim Caughey offered CNBC their tech stock picks — and pans. (Part Two)

  • Merrill Lynch is seeing heavy put activity among options traders Wednesday, as its stock plunges to lows not seen in more than a decade. The November options volume is already four times the recent averages and December is more than six times normal levels.

  • Financials account for some 12 percent of the S&P 500 — but 30 percent of the decline Wednesday. So who's the worst of the worst?

  • Mark Parr of KeyBanc Capital Markets says one thing that investors can count on in this fragile economy is the infrastructure build-out, both domestically and globally.  "Steel's been near and dear to my heart for a long time," he said.

  • What's (not) up with small cap stocks? A glance at the market Tuesday showed the Dow down about 1 percent but the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index down more than 3 percent, causing many an observer to wonder what the heck is — or isn't — going on with the little guys.

  • A stock that has seen some of the most volatile swings Tuesday is not a name that has dominated headlines during the economic crisis...