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Options Stock Options

  • Banks are anathema to stock-market investors now, but Peter Sorrentino of Huntington Asset Advisors says that will change — probably around the middle of next year.

  • China, the emerging economy with so much promise, has often been criticized as a bubble waiting to burst.  Well, it turns out that the U.S., Europe, Australia and the entire global economy was in the same bubble bath that's turned cold.  And while China may not be hot, it certainly is faring better than the U.S..

  • Motorola has had about as much good news as I've got hair: The company is losing market share every day, and its commoditized business is under attack by Samsung, LG, Nokia, and HTC. But as bad as things are, MOT shares may be worth a look now...

  • Volatility in financial stocks, particularly Citigroup and Merrill Lynch, remains very high, according to Rebecca Darst, equity options analyst with TheStreet.com.

  • Telcos, pharmas and some media stocks present investment opportunities now, according to Fergus O'Sullivan, managing director at Morgan Stanley.

  • Richard Sparks of Schaeffer's Investment Research admits the current market environment is a tough one, but he still has some suggestions about where a stock investor's money should go.

  • Car sales are off a cliff, financials are drowning in red ink, and retailers are facing the worst holiday-shopping season in recent memory. So what isn't a disaster?  Howard Rubel of Jefferies & Co. points investors toward defense companies.

  • The rules for investing in technology have changed as much as the markets themselves. Weiss Capital's Mike Burnick and Fort Pitt Capital's Kim Caughey offered CNBC their tech stock picks — and pans. (Part One)

  • The rules for investing in technology have changed as much as the markets themselves. Weiss Capital's Mike Burnick and Fort Pitt Capital's Kim Caughey offered CNBC their tech stock picks — and pans. (Part Two)

  • Merrill Lynch is seeing heavy put activity among options traders Wednesday, as its stock plunges to lows not seen in more than a decade. The November options volume is already four times the recent averages and December is more than six times normal levels.

  • Financials account for some 12 percent of the S&P 500 — but 30 percent of the decline Wednesday. So who's the worst of the worst?

  • Mark Parr of KeyBanc Capital Markets says one thing that investors can count on in this fragile economy is the infrastructure build-out, both domestically and globally.  "Steel's been near and dear to my heart for a long time," he said.

  • What's (not) up with small cap stocks? A glance at the market Tuesday showed the Dow down about 1 percent but the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index down more than 3 percent, causing many an observer to wonder what the heck is — or isn't — going on with the little guys.

  • A stock that has seen some of the most volatile swings Tuesday is not a name that has dominated headlines during the economic crisis...

  • Almost every asset class — with the exception of U.S. Treasury bonds — will provide good opportunities for investors willing to take a long-term view, says Fritz Meyer, senior market strategist at Invesco AIM.

  • America's push toward alternative and renewable energy sources is a big plus for companies involved in those fields.  John Quealy of Canaccord Adams offers "smart grid" advice — and stock picks.

  • Options traders on Monday are betting against GameStop, which has been in consistent decline for the last six months. The videogame retail chain's stock is up about 9 percent from its low of $21 last week — but still nowhere near its highs of nearly $60 in mid-April.

  • As recession fears continue to spread globally, investment banks like Goldman Sachs scramble to survive — and investment gurus alter their tactics and strategies to roll with the damage. CNBC's expert advisors gave their outlooks on what's coming and what to do about it.

  • Health-care reform is not the only thing big pharmaceuticals have to fear, according to Deutsche Bank's Barbara Ryan.  There's also the rapidly-growing dominance of generic prescription drugs.  Still, she likes several big-name companies in the field.

  • Cost containment may spell trouble for much of the health-care sector, but Charles Boorady, healthcare providers analyst for Citigroup, says it's likely to spell success for pharmacy benefits managers.