Options Stock Options

  • Consider this the next time you're enjoying your in-flight movie and sipping a complimentary Sauvignon Blanc at 30,000 feet: the fuel powering the engines, keeping your jet at cruising altitude and speeding you onwards to your destination is the single biggest cost airlines must bear.

  • Small caps have outperformed their larger counterparts for several years now: the S&P SmallCap Index returned 45% in the last three years -- that’s almost double the S&P 500’s 26% gain. Will the run last through 2007?

  • One share, one vote? Not exactly: the fate of millions of shares and the rights of shareholders may be up for grabs, as the U.S. House Financial Services Committee is considering a bill that would give investors final say over CEO compensation. Two experts debated the wisdom of such a bill, on "Morning Call."

  • Lewis, who turns 60 next month, realized $77.04 million from the exercise of 4.08 million stock options, and had $14.54 million of stock awards vest, according to the bank's proxy filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • Walt Disney has completed its investigation into stock options grant practices at Pixar Animation, which Disney acquired last year, according to a statement on Friday by Disney board Chairman John Pepper.

  • Dozens of companies are being investigated for backdating stock options to the days that followed the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, and profiting on the back of the equity-market slump that resulted, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

  • Jason Trennert says that people concentrating on the past week's whipsaw market are looking at the wrong things -- at least, when it comes to the health of big brokerage houses. The chief investment strategist of Strategas Research Partners joined "Closing Bell" to weigh in on the Wall Street giants.

  • Does the current market turmoil mean the big brokerage houses are in trouble? Depends whom you ask. CNBC's Sue Herera heard from two experts -- with two very different outlooks on the industry.

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    So, you've won $1 million in CNBC.com's Million Dollar Portfolio Challenge. Now what? That's the question posed by CNBC's Margaret Brennan on "Morning Call." Three strategists were on deck to advise her -- and the Challenge's participants.

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    Never mind the meltdown: Two "Morning Call" guests say this past week's stock slide was "pretty normal" -- and it may turn out to be a good year for equities, after all.

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    With so many investors expecting the current downturn in stocks to be short-lived, returning to U.S equity markets before the volatility has reduced could be the best strategy. Robert Weissenstein, chief investment officer for Private Banking Americas at Credit Suisse, certainly thinks there are opportunities to be had -- and the time is now.

  • Small investors might have gotten burned by Tuesday's market frenzy. But what of the big brokerage houses? Two bond and portfolio managers told CNBC's Maria Bartiromo that they're not worried.

  • People pass the statue of the bull near Wall Street in New York on Jan. 5, 2004, file photo. Artist Arturo Di Modica, who sculpted and owns the famous statue, is selling it to the highest bidder with a catch: it must stay where it is and be donated to the city of New York. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    There’s no doubt that this week’s global selloff has got investors spooked, but what is definitely open for debate is whether the downturn will grow in to a full-blown recession -- or just mark a healthy and much needed correction. The debate raged, on "Squawk Box."

  • Federal prosecutors are strongly considering criminal charges against former executives of Broadcom., Apple, and KLA-Tencor, related to the backdating of stock options, the Wall Street Journal reported on Friday, citing people familiar with the situation.

  • A former senior vice president of the company that runs the Monster job search Web site pleaded guilty Thursday to conspiracy and fraud charges.

  • Federal criminal charges are expected to be announced Thursday against one former executive with Monster Worldwide over backdating of options, according to WNBC's Jonathan Dienst, reporting for CNBC.

  • Ryan Brant, the former chief executive of video game publisher Take-Two Interactive Software, pleaded guilty to criminal charges related to backdating of stock options.

  • A payment from animation studio Pixar, thought to have been arranged by Steve Jobs, to the film director John Lasseter, is raising concerns that it included improperly backdated stock options, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

  • Altria

    It's a stock-watcher's cliché to call Altria shares "smoking" -- but don't tell that to Bonnie Herzog. She's a beverage and tobacco analyst at Citigroup, and she says the company formerly known as Philip Morris is, yes, on fire.

  • Apple said it hadreceived informal requests from the U.S. government for documents and additional information on its past stock-options practices, according to a regulatory filing Friday.