Europe Top News and Analysis Sudan

  • *Flight was on the way to Darfur. KHARTOUM, Oct 7- A Sudanese military plane carrying personnel and equipment to the strife-torn Darfur region crashed near the capital Khartoum on Sunday killing 15 people on board, the army said. The Antonov 12 transport plane was travelling to El Fasher in northern Darfur, military spokesman Al-Sawarmi Khalid said.

  • KHARTOUM, Oct 4- Sudan and South Sudan will remain locked in conflict despite reaching a border security deal last week because they do not trust each other enough to resolve their biggest disputes, leading Sudanese opposition figure Hassan al-Turabi said.

  • *If successful, would be Tullow's second oil discovery in Kenya. NAIROBI, Oct 1- British explorer Tullow Oil Plc and its Canadian partner Africa Oil Corp started drilling a third well in Kenya, extending a campaign to discover more reserves after finding oil in the east African country earlier this year.

  • *NAIROBI- Industry regulator Tea Board of Kenya releases performance report. global growth, with data from Japan to China underscoring sluggish business. weakness in China and Japan as well as persistent worries about the.

  • NAIROBI, Oct 1- Egypt's Citadel Capital could be an investor in Uganda's proposed $2.5 billion oil refinery project, the Egyptian private equity firm's managing director said.

  • Thousands of anti-American protesters tear down the U.S. flag at the American Embassy in Cairo on Sept. 11, 2012, during a demonstration.

    Click to see some of the fallout from this clash between the West’s cherished freedom of expression and the Muslim world’s insistence on respect for its traditions.

  • JUBA, SUDAN - JANUARY 09: Southern Sudanese celebrate at the end of the first day of voting for the independence referendum January 9, 2011 in Juba, Sudan. Southern Sudan is participating in an independence referendum today following a historic 2005 peace treaty that brought an end to decades of civil war between the Arab north and predominantly Christian and animist south. The south is expected to vote around 99 percent to secede from the north which will also give it a majority of Sudan's oil

    The US wants China and Arab states to help foot the $3bn bill for a deal designed to unlock oil production and set Sudan and South Sudan back on the path to peace, the FT reports.

  • The “Fast Money” pros weren’t concerned that the effect of a Saudi pipeline explosion - false, as it turns out - would last.

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    Oil prices are on a roll, and this strategist thinks its bad news for the buck.

  • JP Morgan Chase

    JPMorgan has agreed to pay $88.3 million to settle potential civil liability for apparent violations of a wide range of US sanctions, the Treasury department said.

  • JUBA, SUDAN - JANUARY 09: Southern Sudanese celebrate at the end of the first day of voting for the independence referendum January 9, 2011 in Juba, Sudan. Southern Sudan is participating in an independence referendum today following a historic 2005 peace treaty that brought an end to decades of civil war between the Arab north and predominantly Christian and animist south. The south is expected to vote around 99 percent to secede from the north which will also give it a majority of Sudan's oil

    With South Sudan the world's newest country, a brand new currency is also in the works. Now Sudan is also launching new money. But there's a hitch.

  • JUBA, SUDAN - JANUARY 09: Southern Sudanese celebrate at the end of the first day of voting for the independence referendum January 9, 2011 in Juba, Sudan. Southern Sudan is participating in an independence referendum today following a historic 2005 peace treaty that brought an end to decades of civil war between the Arab north and predominantly Christian and animist south. The south is expected to vote around 99 percent to secede from the north which will also give it a majority of Sudan's oil

    On Saturday, South Sudan becomes the world's newest country and Africa's 54th state, a process that follows 50 years of bloodshed. Renewed violence on its borders has shaken hopes of a peaceful transition to nationhood, but the fledgling country is not a failed state in waiting, analysts and senior figures in the reconstruction effort told CNBC.com.

  • With civil unrest spreading from the Middle East to other countries around the world with the help of social networking, it seems that no authoritarian ruler is safe. With this in mind, the question is who's next? The sudden disintegration of the multi-decade rule of leaders like Hosni Mubarak suggests that other long-standing dictators could go.Although Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and North Korea's Kim Jong Il draw the world's attention, the list of rulers considered to be dictators is a long one.A

    So, which dictators have been in power the longest and how have their economies fared under their rule? Find out!

  • A woman leaves a branch of Barclays Bank in central London, Monday, April 23, 2007. ABN Amro NV and Barclays PLC announced Monday they have agreed to merge, in the largest cross-border combination in European banking history. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

    Barclays has agreed to pay $298 million over criminal allegations that it illegally engaged in financial transactions with banks in Cuba, Iran, Libya, Sudan and Burma, the Justice Department disclosed in court papers filed Monday.

  • Airplane

    The EU banned all airlines from the Philippines and Sudan from flying into the region’s airports Tuesday, citing “serious safety deficiencies” found by the UN and U.S. aviation authorities, the New York Times reports.

  • While the Save Darfur Coalition mildly "applauded" Berkshire Hathaway's PetroChina sales, even if they weren't driven by human-rights concerns, another group that's been urging Warren Buffett to divest is more direct in its criticism.

  • A group that's been urging Warren Buffett to divest Berkshire Hathaway's PetroChina holdings is "applauding" today, even if it might not like Buffett's stated reason for selling the entire stake.

  • The Wall Street Journal's widely followed Heard on the Street column today focuses on Warren Buffett's big PetroChina sales in recent weeks, even as the stock has rallied to new highs. It neatly recaps the question we've been asking here at WBW: Is Buffett selling because he thinks PetroChina has become overvalued after an enormous run-up or is he selling in response to human-rights activists who see divestment as a way to pressure China over its ties to Sudan, which is accused of supporting mass killings in Darfur?

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    Warren Buffett may be making big cuts in his PetroChina holdings, but another very well-known international investor is sticking with the big Chinese energy company.  Mark Mobius says just because Buffett is selling, don't assume the stock is going lower.  Indeed, Buffett may have something very different in mind.

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    The PetroChina selling continues and continues to accelerate at Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway.  In a filing with the SEC made public just moments ago, Berkshire reveals that as of September 30 its controversial stake in the Chinese energy company had dropped to just 3.1%. That follows a flurry of selling in September that brought the holdings from from just under 10% when the month started.