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Law Supreme Court (U.S.)

  • Protesters demonstrate against U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order on immigration outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, DC.

    The Supreme Court has almost certainly decided what to do about President Trump's travel ban affecting citizens of six mostly Muslim countries, and will announce their decision no later than late next week.

  • NASHVILLE, Tenn.— A U.S. Supreme Court action this week in a labor case involving Macy's department store workers should persuade Volkswagen to drop its legal challenges to the United Auto Workers' representation of skilled-trades workers at German automaker's lone U.S. plant in Tennessee, union officials said Thursday. Macy's made much the same arguments in...

  • Bottles of Johnson & Johnson baby powder line a drugstore shelf in New York.

    Johnson & Johnson is seizing upon a U.S. Supreme Court ruling from Monday limiting where injury lawsuits can be filed to fight off claims it failed to warn women that talcum powder could cause ovarian cancer.

  • A fifth of the plaintiffs have cases pending in state court in St. Louis, where juries in four trials have hit J&J and a talc supplier with $307 million in verdicts. Those four cases and most of the others on the St. Louis docket involve out-of-state plaintiffs suing an out-of-state company. "We believe the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the Bristol-Myers Squibb...

  • June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court has sided with business interests in a series of cases in its current term, which began in October and is due to end next week. In 19 business-related cases that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce participated in by filing briefs backing companies, the lobbying group was on the winning side in 13 of them, with two yet to be decided.

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The Supreme Court on Monday slapped limits on where injury lawsuits may be filed for the second time in three weeks, again siding with businesses that want to prevent plaintiffs from "shopping" for friendly courts for their cases. In an 8-1 ruling, the justices overturned a lower court's decision that had allowed hundreds of out-of-state...

  • ST. LOUIS— A St. Louis judge has declared a mistrial in a talcum powder trial after the U.S. Supreme Court placed limits on where injury lawsuits could be filed. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that St. Louis Circuit Judge Rex Burlison on Monday declared a mistrial in a case in which two out-of-state plaintiffs are part of a suit against Johnson& Johnson, claiming...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed a victory to Chevron Corp by preventing Ecuadorean villagers and their American lawyer from trying to collect on an $8.65 billion pollution judgment issued against the oil company by a court in Ecuador. The justices turned away an appeal by New York- based lawyer Steven Donziger, who has spent more than...

  • *Ruling could affect case about NFL's Washington Redskins. WASHINGTON, June 19- In a decision that could benefit the NFL's Washington Redskins, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday threw out a federal prohibition on disparaging trademarks as a constitutional violation in a major free speech ruling involving a band called The Slants. The National Football League...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The Supreme Court on Monday slapped limits on where injury lawsuits may be filed for the second time in three weeks, again siding with businesses that want to prevent plaintiffs from "shopping" for friendly courts for their cases. The Supreme Court on May 30 reached a similar conclusion in a separate case involving out-of-state injury claims...

  • People wait in line to enter the US Supreme Court.

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a law forbidding official registration of offensive trademarks unconstitutionally limits free speech.

  • WASHINGTON— The Supreme Court says hundreds of out-state-residents can't sue drugmaker Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. in California state court over adverse reactions to the blood thinner Plavix. The case involved 575 non- California residents who joined 86 California residents in suing the New Jersey- based company. California's highest court ruled 4-3 that...

  • The Supreme Court agreed to decide whether electoral maps drawn deliberately to favor a particular political party are acceptable under the Constitution in a case that could have huge consequences for American elections in the future.

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday tightened rules on where injury lawsuits may be filed, handing a victory to corporations by undercutting the ability of plaintiffs to bring claims in friendly courts in a case involving litigation over the Bristol-Myers Squibb Co blood-thinning medication Plavix. The justices, in an 8-1 ruling, threw out a...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a law forbidding official registration of offensive trademarks unconstitutionally limits free speech in a case involving a band called The Slants, an outcome the government has said could lead to a proliferation of racial slurs as sanctioned trademarks. The ruling is expected to have a direct...

  • WASHINGTON— The Supreme Court struck down a North Carolina law Monday that bars convicted sex offenders from Facebook, Twitter and other popular sites. The justices ruled unanimously in favor of North Carolina resident Lester Packingham Jr. His Facebook boast about beating a traffic ticket led to his conviction for violating a 2008 law aimed at keeping sex...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a law forbidding official registration of offensive trademarks unconstitutionally limits free speech in a case involving a band called The Slants, an outcome the government has said could lead to a proliferation of racial slurs as sanctioned trademarks. The ruling is expected to have a direct...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a law forbidding official registration of offensive trademarks unconstitutionally limits free speech in a case involving a band called The Slants, an outcome the government has said could lead to a proliferation of racial slurs as sanctioned trademarks. The court ruled in favor of Portland,...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a closely watched copyright dispute known as the "dancing baby" case over a company's move to take down a home video posted online showing a toddler joyfully bouncing to the late pop star Prince's song "Let's Go Crazy." The case pitted a Pennsylvania woman, Stephanie Lenz, against record company...

  • WASHINGTON, June 19- The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday handed a victory to Chevron Corp by preventing Ecuadorean villagers and their American lawyer from trying to collect on an $8.65 billion pollution judgment issued against the oil company by a court in Ecuador. The justices turned away an appeal by New York- based lawyer Steven Donziger, who has spent more than...