Europe Top News and Analysis Sweden

More

  • Yes, the euro is struggling and Greece is a mess. Still. Time to look elsewhere for a fresh trading idea.

  • romania2.jpg

    Swedish construction company Skanska is expanding to Romania, banking on growth potential and infrastructure needs in the European Union's newest member, Skanska Executive Vice President Roman Wieczorek told CNBC.com.

  • Tough talk from interest-rate hawks has sent the krona sharply higher. How much further can it go?

  • Kristianstad, Sweden

    Like the hopeful delegates in Cancun, officials in Kristianstad pledged a decade ago to power the city entirely from renewable resources by 2010 — without really knowing if it was possible or affordable.

  • Sweden's central bank has raised its key interest rate by a quarter of a percentage point to 1 percent due to expectations that inflation will increase as economic activity picks up.

  • Ikea.jpg

    Ikea, the world’s largest furniture retailer, has publicly disclosed its profits for the first time in an effort to rid itself of a reputation of being highly secretive. The FT reports.

  • Swedish writer Camilla Lackberg.

    Camilla Lackberg has written seven blockbuster novels in her native Swedish but, until now, no one bothered to translate and publish any of them in the United States. And she has a tattooed, secretive, bisexual computer hacker named Lisbeth Salander to thank for it.

  • sweden_flag_200.jpg

    Sweden’s top banks are going their separate ways on the question of employee bonuses. The New York Times explains.

  • Greece needs to act on fraudulent reporting and political meddling of statistics to regain its credibility in the eyes of the European Union, Swedish Finance Minister Anders Borg told CNBC late Tuesday.

  • The Nobel Foundation might  have to reduce the money it awards winners of its prestigous prizes due to the effects of the global financial crisis, its director said on Saturday.

  • Taxes

    Soon the IRS tax form will be two lines and two lines only. First will be how much did you make, second will simply be the instructions to send it all in. The tax plans coming out of Congress to pay for the health proposals are punitive and confiscatory (but are likely to kill any chances that the bill would be enacted into law).

  • As the buzz about economic recovery grows louder, a new survey reveals the best place in the world to ride out the rest of the recession, which could be one of the first stops on the recovery train.

  • sweden.jpg

    Swedish bank Swedbank reported Thursday a first-quarter net loss, disappointing analysts' expectations for a profit, due to large provisions for loan losses in its hard-hit Baltic operations.

  • Four men linked to popular file-sharing site The Pirate Bay were convicted Friday of breaking Sweden's copyright law by helping millions of users freely download music, movies and computer games on the Internet.

  • saab_9x_biohybrid_1.jpg

    Saab Automobile may be just another crisis-ridden car company in an industry full of them. But just as the fortunes of Flint, Mich., are permanently entangled with General Motors, so it is impossible to find anyone in this city in southwest Sweden who is not somehow connected to Saab.

  • Sweden's government says it is ready to inject 50 billion kronor ($6 billion) into the nation's banks in a fresh bailout initiative designed to boost lending to Swedish companies hurt by the credit crunch.

  • Treasury Seal

    Officials in Washington try to figure out how to shore up banks that once ruled the financial world but now seem to weaken by the day, despite receiving hundreds of billions in aid.

  • Ericsson posted stronger-than-expect ed third-quarter earnings on Monday, benefiting from heavy network traffic and emerging unscathed from the financial turmoil roiling world markets.

  • Countries across Europe have moved to reassure banking customers by guaranteeing deposits. Fear of runs on banks prompted some account holders to take their money overseas to foreign banks, protected by government pledges, or simply opt for the relative safety of keeping funds out of institutions.» »

    European finance ministers moved to reassure banking customers by agreeing to raise bank-deposit guarantees to 50,000 euros ($67,930), from the current level of 20,000 euros.

  • sweden.jpg

    When it comes to budget busting financial bailouts, the U.S. could take a lesson from Sweden, reports the New York Times.