Europe Top News and Analysis Switzerland

  • Chinese students play online computer games at an internet cafe in Hangzhou.

    As demand for technology rises in the larger emerging markets, U.S.-based companies will find both more opportunities and competition for their products overseas.

  • wallst_sign_winter_200.jpg

    Stocks are seeing some of their loftiest gains deflate, and that could continue as investors weigh dozens of major earnings reports and a fresh series of economic news in the week ahead.

  • Zurich, Switzerland

    Swiss policymakers will hold an emergency meeting with key business groups, labor unions and representatives from the machinery, tourism and pharmaceutical sectors to discuss the Swiss franc's damaging impact on the Alpine country's economy Friday.

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Less than a month after bailing out Ireland, and after a holiday lull in the markets that may have looked mistakenly like calming, the European Union is again struggling to persuade investors that it has the cash and the will to address the root cause of its travails. The New York Times reports.

  • Euros at an angle

    When the Swiss central bank confirmed today that it has excluded Irish government debt from a list of assets considered eligible as collateral for its repo transactions, it created broader worries about the exposure of other eurozone nations to decisions from Alpine bankers.

  • dublin commuters the earl

    The Swiss central bank confirmed it has excluded Irish government debt from a list of assets considered eligible as collateral for its repo deals – operations under which it lends money against collateral.

  • Estonia

    On Saturday, Estonia completes its trip from Soviet republic to full-fledged member of the euro zone, reports the New York Times.

  • Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Roche said it would appeal a decision by the US Food and Drug Administration to remove the approval for the drug’s indication for metastatic breast cancer, but analysts doubt the appeal would be successful.

  • UBS

    Banking giant UBS launched a dress code for its retail client-facing employees in Switzerland, reminding them to button up.

  • Chemical giant Transammonia is ending all ties with Iran following a CNBC investigation into its business dealings there.

  • lisbon portugal

    The euro once meant flush banks and easy credit, but these days it has laid bare a cold reality: Portugal shares the high wages and prices of richer northern European neighbors, but not their competitiveness, reports the New York Times.

  • Swiss bank UBS says customers may withdraw 15-40 billion Swiss francs ($15-41 billion) because of revised tax treaties between Switzerland and other European countries.

  • Dublin, Ireland

    When interest rates soared last week on Irish government bonds, it served as a warning to other indebted nations of how difficult it could be to roll back decades of public sector largess. The New York Times reports.

  • Mortgage

    Covered bonds, a financing tool that has been popular in Europe since the 18th century, are winning converts here as a new way to finance residential and commercial mortgages, reports the New York Times.

  • global_currency_200.jpg

    Fast-growing nations like Thailand are trying to devalue their exchange rates to bolster their export-driven economies, reports the New York Times.

  • AA10_pocketwatch_200.jpg

    Vintage or antique timepieces can fetch extraordinary prices, but they better possess unique and still functional features, be in scarce supply, carry a distinguished brand name and be in near-mint condition.

  • People demonstrate to say ''no to austerity'', in Brussels. Police threw a ring of steel around EU headquarters as tens of thousands in a sea of banners from across Europe took to the streets in a worker backlash against painful spending cuts. The protest, the biggest such march since 2001 when 80,000 people invaded the Belgian capital, was timed to coincide with an EU plan to fine governments running up deficits.

    Despite mounting public protests across the Continent, an austerity drive unparalleled in modern, united Europe is building, reports the New York Times.

  • home_pregnant_200.jpg

    Every week without fail Lucy Elkin, a comfortably middle-class mother of two small children, receives a £33.20 child benefit payment, or about $52, from the debt-plagued British government, reports the New York Times.

  • greece_athens_academy_2_200.jpg

    In two weeks, Alexandra Mallosi, 29, will be packing her bags and leaving the quiet Athens suburb of Holargos for Abu Dhabi to start a job as a hotel sales manager. It was not a tough decision, reports the New York Times.

  • Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    The Swiss franc's safe-haven reputation helped it hit a new high against the euro, but the currency's strength risks hurting those who have relied on its vigor.