Europe Top News and Analysis Switzerland

  • George Soros

    Higher commodities prices and an uptick in China's inflation rate  are putting the global economy in a better situation by cutting the potential for deflation, George Soros, chairman of Soros Fund Management, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan

    Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan is responsible for administrating pensions for public school teachers of Ontario. OTPP has over 100 billion in assets, and is up an average of 9.7 percent since it was established in 1990 as an independent organization.

  • Davos 2011 - A CNBC Special Report

    A focus by countries on developing a skilled workforce through improvements in education is necessary, according to participants in a CNBC debate at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

  • Stephen A. Schwarzman

    Stephen Schwarzman, founder and CEO of the Blackstone Group, called the State-of-the-Union speech part of a welcome move to the center following the midterm elections.

  • Davos 2011 - See Complete Coverage

    It has been 125 years since the first icy-cold coke was served. And today, CEO Muhtar Kent outlined key initiatives the company is taking to keep Coke as one of the most recognized and successful companies throughout the globe.

  • Nouriel Roubini guest hosts Squawk Box on CNBC.

    The White House plan to partially freeze government spending is just "spare change" compared to a budget deficit of more than $1 trillion and eventually the US will have to raise taxes, economist Nouriel Roubini told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Everyone gets the same color badge chain. But badge colors highlight the WEF caste system.

    Chief executives, government leaders and academics around the world are headed to Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting this week — a heady power gathering that mixes business, politics and Champagne in the Swiss Alps.

  • european_union_cracked_200.jpg

    At least for this year, the euro zone will remain united  and no country is likely to default, analysts told CNBC.com. But debt restructuring is on the horizon for later.

  • Davos, Switzerland.

    "I'm very excited about this year’s meeting, particularly because it's two years after the financial crisis. And we're beginning to see some real stabilization in the economy. As we prepare for a lot of interviews and the various sessions, I will be thinking about what pockets of the world will be critical to global economic growth," says CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.

  • Davos skyline at night

    Government policymakers in Davos this week looking to revive growth might want to emulate global mutual-fund managers, who are having no trouble finding growth stories across the developing world and in pockets of developed markets.

  • Trade

    Though the US-China relationship often dominates the geopolitical trade debate, Beijing is now the top trading partner for Japan, Australia and South Africa, as well as South Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

  • WEF_top_200.jpg

    Political and business leaders invited to the World Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos this week will sift through the blessings and curses of global interdependence that not only brought the world’s economies to a collective low three years ago but also provide the only realistic return to prosperity

  • Solar plant in Lucainena de las Torres, Almeria, Andalucia, Spain

    Global leadership in the sector is still fragmented—the U.S. China, Brazil and Israel can all lay claim in certain fields—but there's no doubt the sector’s center of gravity is moving slowly from the developed economies to the emerging markets.

  • Christ the Redeemer statue, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    After decades of boom to bust behavior, economies  from Mexico to Brazil are looking dynamic, diverse and  durable, helped by a wealth of natural resources and a good measure of fiscal discipline.

  • New York Stock Exchange

    The catchy and no doubt memorable phrase coined by Pimco boss Bill Gross amid the financial crisis is rapidly disappearing from Wall Street’s lexicon—and probably Davos' as well.

  • While Europe struggles with its sovereign debt crisis, the U.S. is running up enormous budget deficits of its own. Which is in worse financial shape.

  • Chinese students play online computer games at an internet cafe in Hangzhou.

    As demand for technology rises in the larger emerging markets, U.S.-based companies will find both more opportunities and competition for their products overseas.

  • wallst_sign_winter_200.jpg

    Stocks are seeing some of their loftiest gains deflate, and that could continue as investors weigh dozens of major earnings reports and a fresh series of economic news in the week ahead.

  • Zurich, Switzerland

    Swiss policymakers will hold an emergency meeting with key business groups, labor unions and representatives from the machinery, tourism and pharmaceutical sectors to discuss the Swiss franc's damaging impact on the Alpine country's economy Friday.

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Less than a month after bailing out Ireland, and after a holiday lull in the markets that may have looked mistakenly like calming, the European Union is again struggling to persuade investors that it has the cash and the will to address the root cause of its travails. The New York Times reports.