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Europe Top News and Analysis Syria

  • The Syria problem, the Obama solution

    CNBC's Eamon Javers provides an update on Congressional debate over the situation in Syria, and Bill Burton, co-founder, Priorities USA Action, expresses his support for U.S. action in that country.

  • Syria: Should we, shouldn't we?

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports the latest news from the Congressional debate over U.S. involvement in Syria.

  • What would a U.S. strike in Syria look like

    A U.S. military strike in Syria would aim to only weaken President Assad and not topple him reports NBC's Jim Maceda from Turkey.

  • Who owns the 'red line?'

    President Obama said "I didn't set a red line, the world set a red line." Carrie Wofford, Wofford Strategies; Ramesh Ponnuru, National Review; and Peter Costa, National Review, provide perspective.

  • Can't ask military to do more with less: Rep. McKeon

    Rep. Buck McKeon (R-CA), offers insight on Obama's plan for Syria and discusses costs in Washington. NBC's Steve Handelsman reports.

  • House and Senate considering military action

    The Senate Foreign Relations Committee has approved a resolution on Syria. Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-NY), provides reaction as the vote now moves to the Senate floor.

  • Syria: Hearings on the Hill

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports the latest from the congressional hearings on Capitol Hill deciding military action in Syria.

  • Possible Senate vote today

    The Senate Foreign Relations Committee is voting on authorizing a military strike on Syria. CNBC's Eamon Javers reports politicians are split on the issue, including Sen. McCain who is arguing for tougher language.

  • Syria: What the public thinks

    CNBC's John Harwood is in Midwest City, Oklahoma after spending 24 hours with Rep. Tom Cole, R-OK. The public is voicing its opinion on the sequester, and Syria.

  • Syria, sequester & defense

    CNBC's Steve Liesman reports on the cost of President Obama's proposed military strike. CNBC contributor Ben White discusses the market impact of a potential U.S. strike in Syria.

  • Without intervention, Syria will spiral: pro

    Jane Kinninmont, senior research fellow at Chatham House, discusses the U.S.'s stance on Syria, and says that whatever happens, political risk will keep on rising.

  • Awaiting House hearing on Syria

    The House Foreign Affairs Committee will hold a hearing the Obama Administration's potential military response to Syria. Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-TN) and Rep. Brad Sherman (D-CA) debate military action.

  • Jobs data key for Treasurys: broker

    Bill Blain, senior fixed income broker at Mint Partners, explains that the upcoming U.S. job number is key as it could send Treasurys above the 3 percent level.

  • Pres Obama: World drew 'red line'

    The President said it was the world that drew the 'red line' over using chemical weapons. CNBC's John Harwood is in Oklahoma and looks at how the middle of the country views a potential military strike.

  • Russian President Putin warned against taking one-sided action in Syria but also said he "doesn't exclude" supporting a U.N. resolution on punitive military strikes.

  • Reading the Joint Chief's mood

    General Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of staff, gave off some interesting signals during yesterday's Senate testimony, reports CNBC's Eamon Javers.

  • Hate to be short gold, given Middle East: Pro

    Sean Hyman, editor of Moneynews, Ultimate Wealth Report, discusses the risks for the gold short seller and why he's so bullish over the precious metal. Carl Larry, Oil Outlooks & Opinions, and Marc Chandler, Brown Brothers Harriman, look at oil, currencies, and the taper, respectively. With New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft.

  • Some Syria built in to market: Pro

    Barbara Marcin, Gabelli Dividend Income Fund, discusses the impact of Syria on investors and whether U.S. involvement there will create an issue when it comes to raising the debt ceiling.

  • Congress debates Syria action

    CNBC's Eamon Javers discusses comments made Tuesday in Secretary of State John Kerry's testimony to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. His remarks seemed to leave open the possibility of U.S. ground troops should the situation in Syria implode.

  • Syria vote could come today

    CNBC's Eamon Javers reports the latest details on the situation in Syria, including Secretary of State John Kerry's testimony in front of a Senate Committee. The Senate could vote to authorize action today, says Javers.