Consumer Durables and Apparel Textiles Apparel and Luxury Goods

  • Two women look at a jewelry display in a luxury shopping mall in Shanghai. Following in the footsteps of Japan, China has become the world's second-largest consumer of high-end fashion, accessories and luxury goods.

    Economic growth in China has created a voracious appetite for luxury goods. Now wealthy shoppers there are shunning labels they see as tainted by the common touch.

  • Prada Shopper

    As Asia cools and Europe’s middling wealthy hunker down, the super-rich are expected to be the prime movers in the market for luxury goods.

  • Fab.com sale

    Flash-sale websites such as Gilt Groupe and Ru La La were hailed as disruptors in the ecommerce space, but recently there’s been a bit of a disruption in their success story, prompting some to wonder if flash-sale sites are more of a marketing gimmick than a sustainable business model.

  • Tiffany Gift Box

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  • Every so often, a movie or television show depicts a character in an outfit that becomes iconic. It probably isn’t the intention of most filmmakers to inspire fashion revolutions with their movies, but the makers of “Flashdance” probably didn’t mind when America’s teenage girls started blowing their entire allowances on legwarmers.Not every movie or television show can achieve such a feat on that kind of scale, but many try, with varying degrees of success. What follows is a list of those that m

    What follows is a list of those that made an article of clothing famous, made characters famous for fashion sense, or managed some combination of the two.

  • This year at the Walpole China Luxury Conference in London there were actually bears in the room. Many expressed concern that if European consumer spending slowed, spending from China will not be enough to offset the weakness.

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    According to digital performance company iProspect, there are 19 million affluent men online, and the vast majority of them are shopping. Nearly half of these wealthy men spend more than $4,000 a year online.

  • Tumi Luggage

    Coming off a year where global IPO performance declined across the board, shares of Tumi Holdings traveled in high style during their debut on the Big Board.

  • Dov Charney

    American Apparel has gone through the ringer like a worn out T-shirt. However, its controversial CEO says that not only his clothing, but his business model, will be more durable than anything made in China.

  • There are few sensations that can beat the thrill of a frivolous purchase. After struggling all month to make sure that the rent, bills and car payments are paid in a timely fashion, it can be downright exhilarating to blow a big chunk of change on something unnecessary.Sadly, the thrill passes once the next billing cycle kicks in. That $300 pair of shoes may have seemed like a well-deserved extravagance, but now it’s starting to feel like an ill-advised and anxiety-provoking mistake.The morning

    Billionaires can buy every toy that catches their fancy, including antique cars, jumbo jets, and spaceships. What are some of the toys the world’s billionaires have bought?

  • J.C. Penney vs. Kohls

    JPMorgan is reducing J.C. Penney's F12 same-store sales estimates since sales trends appear softer than anticipated, with the Fast Money traders.

  • neiman_marcus.jpg

    Luxury retailer Neiman Marcus announced plans to launch an ecommerce website in China by year-end to cash in on the country’s strong interest in high-end brands and growing spending power.

  • A man walks past a billboard outside a shopping mall housing luxury brands in Shanghai.

    Jiang Qiong’er, Shang Xia’s founder, is determined to help China cast off the inferiority complex that comes of decades of producing cheap trinkets.  If succesful, it could herald the emergence of China as a power to reckon with in the global luxury business and provide a blueprint for other local brands to become globally competitive, the FT reports.

  • Diane Von Furstenberg for GapKids

    Childrenswear is attracting the eye of fashion designers as they launch lines to cater to consumers who want to deck their children out in the latest trends — even if it means paying premium prices.

  • A model walks the runway at the BCBG Max Azria Autumn Winter 2012 fashion show during New York Fashion Week.

    Consumers are in the driver’s seat as retailers move away from wardrobe staples and shift to fashion-forward pieces while planning their upcoming fall inventories, industry analysts said.

  • Tumi Luggage

    Many retailers rung up strong sales during the holiday season, putting them in a position to leverage this success in an initial public offering, said Ted Vaughan, a partner in the retail and consumer products practice of BDO USA. 

  • Nordstrom Off The Rack

    High-end department store Nordstrom is funneling its returned and worn shoes to its Nordstrom Rack outlet stores. A look at what this practice means for the Nordstrom brand. Is there a fine line between being an outlet store and a thrift store?

  • Luxury Spending

    From high heels to high-octane driving, the world of luxury is on fire. CNBC's Courtney Reagan sits down with President of Manolo Blahnik, George Malkemus, to talk about the demand for quality and craftsmanship in their designer shoes. Get a sneak peek at a limited edition Ferrari that sold out in less than an hour!

  • A man walks past a billboard outside a shopping mall housing luxury brands in Shanghai.

    Chinese shoppers have become a fixture of the luxury retail scene in the US and Europe, drawn by much cheaper prices than at home. But many upscale brands have yet to bond with China’s million millionaires. The Financial Times reports.

  • Fourteen-year-old Khine Thwin tries on sunglasses at a Hot Topic retail store at the Serramonte Mall in Daly City, CA.

    Australian surfwear company Billabong International said it will sell a stake in its Nixon brand watch brand and close up to 150 stores to fend off a $820 million private equity bid, sending its shares up by more than 50 percent on Friday.