Computer Hardware Tim Cook

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  • Steve Wozniak

    Apple is fighting authorities on privacy, and its co-founder Steve Wozniak believes late CEO Steve Jobs would have done the same.

  • An employee demonstrates a Motorola Moto E android smartphone in the Lenovo Group Ltd. pavilion at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain.

    While the FBI pressures Apple to help crack an attacker's iPhone, the situation could be more complicated if it were dealing with an Android.

  • A woman uses an iPhone in Munich, Germany.

    If you want to be angry about privacy loss, focus it on corporations like Apple and Google, not law enforcement, says this former FBI official.

  • An Apple Inc. iPhone is covered with chains

    Silicon Valley is bracing for a showdown with the US government on encryption.

  • Apple's Dilemma: Customer Privacy or Help the Fed

    West Point's Cyber Policy Fellow Dr. Aaron Brantly and U.C. Berkeley's James Dempsey debate Apple's moral dilemma.

  • Apple's Dilemma: Customer Privacy or Help the Fed

    West Point's Cyber Policy Fellow Dr. Aaron Brantly and U.C. Berkeley's James Dempsey debate Apple's moral dilemma.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an Apple special event at the Flint Center for the Performing Arts on September 9, 2014 in Cupertino, California.

    Apple's fight with the government is complicated. Former FBI advisor David M. Shapiro breaks down the issues.

  • Mark Cuban

    Mark Cuban weighed in on the Apple vs. FBI debate and sides with the tech giant, citing the importance of preserving civil liberties.

  • Is Tim Cook a 'national security hero?'

    Nico Sell, Wickr co-founder, and Bob Davis, Highland Capital Partners, provide insight to the price of privacy and security and whether Apple should aid the FBI in unlocking access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooters.

  • Executive Edge: Apple privacy vs. FBI security

    The "Squawk Box" news team and Eric O'Neill, Carbon Black, discuss some of the morning's most provocative headlines, including the debate over Apple's decision to oppose a federal court order to help the FBI unlock a phone used by a suspect in the San Bernardino attack.

  • Feb 17- Apple Inc is resisting a federal court order that it help the U.S. government break into the iPhone 5 c of Rizwan Farook, who along with his wife killed 14 people in a December shooting in San Bernardino, California, which the government has described as a terror attack. The following is an explanation of the technology and data privacy issues at issue.

  • Feb 17- Last October, prosecutors from the Justice Department asked a federal magistrate judge in Brooklyn to issue an order directing Apple to help the Drug Enforcement Administration bust security on an iPhone 5 seized from the home of Jun Feng, a suspected meth dealer. According to a Justice Department brief filed last fall, Apple never objected to All Writs...

  • Feb 17- A court order demanding that Apple Inc help the U.S. government unlock the encrypted iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters opens a new chapter in the legal, political and technological fight pitting law enforcement against civil liberties advocates and major tech companies. A federal judge in Los Angeles on Tuesday ordered Apple to provide "...

  • The Apple Inc. iPhone 5c.

    In its fight against Apple, the Department of Justice is invoking the All Writs Act to obtain data from the iPhone of San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook.

  • Fmr Apple chief: Tim Cook is absolutely correct

    Guy Kawasaki, former Apple chief evangelist, weighs in on Apple vs FBI.

  • Rep. Himes: Implications of FBI vs Apple

    Congressman Jim Himes of Connecticut, a ranking member of the NSA and cybersecurity subcommittee, joins Closing Bell to weigh in on Apple and the FBI proposing an unprecedented use of the All Writs Act of 1789 to justify an expansion of its authority.

  • Feb 17- A court order demanding that Apple Inc help the U.S. government unlock the encrypted iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters opens a new chapter in the legal, political and technological fight pitting law enforcement against civil liberties advocates and major tech companies. A federal judge in Los Angeles on Tuesday ordered Apple to provide "...

  • Vctim's families address Apple court order

    CNBC's Jane Wells retrieves reactions regarding FBI requesting that Apple help break open an iPhone used by a shooter in the San Bernardino attacks.

  • All angles behind court order against Apple

    Apple takes on the FBI saying it will fight a court order it received to break open an iPhone used by a shooter in the San Bernardino attacks. CNBC’s Eamon Javers, Josh Lipton, and Jane Wells report details.

  • The Apple iPhone 6.

    Forcing Apple to create an iPhone hack is dangerous and could invite a world of problems, says Breakingviews columnist Gina Chon.