Market Insider with Patti Domm Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

More

  Monday, 15 Aug 2016 | 3:57 PM ET

Behind a boring stock market, there are great signs for investors

Posted ByBob Pisani
The Merrill Lynch bull, statue and corporate symbol, outside the Merrill Lynch Denver Meridian complex
Cyrus McCrimmon | The Denver Post | Getty Images
The Merrill Lynch bull, statue and corporate symbol, outside the Merrill Lynch Denver Meridian complex

Stocks: Where are we now? Forget the narrow trading range, low volume and low volatility. Beneath the August doldrums, stocks are moving.

»Read more
  Friday, 12 Aug 2016 | 7:00 AM ET

The market signs to watch during the presidential cycle

Posted ByBob Pisani
Signals, signs to watch for, road signs
Larry Washburn | Getty Images

The old Wall Street chestnuts aren't working ... or are they? Several traders have inquired why the old Wall Street chestnuts don't seem to be working any more:

  1. As goes January so goes the year — but the S&P is up 7 percent so far this year!
  2. Sell in May and go away — but the S&P is up 5.8 percent since the end of April!
  3. August is the weakest month of the year — the S&P is up fractionally, though it's still early.

Have we entered some weird new universe? Is the Fed causing these signals to fail? (That's what a lot of traders think.)

»Read more
  Thursday, 11 Aug 2016 | 10:53 AM ET

Macy's finally starts addressing the overstored retail landscape

Posted ByBob Pisani

Pisani: 'Over-stored' rate favorite metric of the day
Pisani: 'Over-stored' rate favorite metric of the day   

Macy's takes the lead and finally starts addressing the overstored retail landscape. Macy's CEO Terry Lundgren showed up on "Squawk Box" to talk about his company's earnings this morning, and threw out one of the more interesting stats I've heard this month.

He noted that the United States has 7.3 square feet of retail space per person, while France and Japan both have 1.7 square feet, and the U.K. has 1.3 square feet.

The United States has almost five times more retail space per person than France, Japan and the U.K.? Yep. Terry rightly described the situation as "ridiculous."

Lundgren is addressing that by announcing Macy's will be closing 100 underperforming stores out of a base of 728. That is quite a reduction. The annual sales loss could approach $1 billion, but that might be offset somewhat by expense savings.

»Read more
  Wednesday, 10 Aug 2016 | 5:54 PM ET

The World Trade Center retail complex is finally opening

Posted ByBob Pisani
World Trade Center site in the Manhattan borough of New York
Andrew Kelly | Reuters
World Trade Center site in the Manhattan borough of New York

The opening of the World Trade Center retail complex comes at an important moment for downtown New York: 15 years after 9/11 the downtown has completely transformed, but is there enough demand for a huge retail complex?

The Westfield World Trade Center, as it is being called, consists of 125 stores, plus Eataly, a 41,000 square-foot food emporium where shoppers can buy 300 types of cheeses, 150 brands of olive oil, 300 types of dried pastas, and dine and drink their way through restaurants, coffee and pastry and prosciutto bars, and take cooking classes.

It all sounds wonderful, but who are the customers? Downtown players I've spoken with identify three key constituents.

Westfield, which is in charge of the retail complex, says it anticipates 15 million global travelers to visit downtown by 2017 to visit the 9/11 Memorial and Museum, 1 WTC Observatory and other local points of interest.

»Read more
  Monday, 8 Aug 2016 | 1:57 PM ET

Pisani: Don't let dull market fool you, something exciting happening in tech

Posted ByBob Pisani

This dull market is masking a tech breakout.

Last week, the Nasdaq composite recorded its first all-time high since July 20, 2015, boosted by the performance of stocks from mega-cap names like eBay, Google, Microsoft and Apple.

In an exclusive video for PRO members, CNBC's Bob Pisani explains what the rally in tech means for the overall stock market.

»Read more
  Monday, 8 Aug 2016 | 7:47 AM ET

Invest in the 'new economy? Kensho rolls out a solution

Posted ByBob Pisani

Introducing the Kensho New Economy Indices
Introducing the Kensho New Economy Indices   

CNBC on Monday is initiating a new way to look at the global economy —specifically a new way to look at a very important part of that economy: the "new economy."

We're launching a new set of tools in conjunction with our partners at Kensho that we and our viewers can use to better understand the rapidly changing economy and investing landscape.

They're called Kensho New Economy Indices, a series of 16 indexes that provide ways to invest in disruptive technologies and trends using the existing public markets.

By the "new economy," we're talking about industries that are poised to grow rapidly in the next decade, and grow fast: The phrase "exponential growth" is often used. But what exactly is it? And more importantly how do you measure it, and how can you invest in it?

»Read more

About Trader Talk with Bob Pisani

  • Direct from the floor of the NYSE, Trader Talk with Bob Pisani provides a dynamic look at the reasons for the day’s actions on Wall Street. If you want to go beyond the latest numbers— Bob will tell you why the market does what it does and what it means for the next day’s trading.

 

  • Bob Pisani

    A CNBC reporter since 1990, Bob Pisani covers Wall Street from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

Wall Street