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  • Goldman Sachs lowered expectations for Ford and JPMorgan offered a dim outlook for AMR and other airline stocks this week.

  • The Trade on Gold, Transports & Apple

    Central Banks jump into the gold trade and stock up on reserves. Insight on whether individual investors should follow their lead and insight on whether the sell off in transports is a sign of things to come for the market and Pete Najarian takes a look at Apple hanging in tough in a weak tape.

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    Major automakers posted July U.S. sales that ticked higher from the slump of recent months, but failed to dispel doubts about the strength of the economy and the mood of American consumers

  • FAA's Future Up in the Air

    The FAA is seeking an extension on temporary funding to end a partial shutdown that's gone on for nearly two weeks. Insight with Ray LaHood, Secretary of Transportation.

  • Ford F-150

    Ford Motor is recalling 1.1 million pickup trucks because the gas tanks can fall off and cause fires.

  • Damaged vehicles in parking lot of St. John's Hospital after tornado hit in Joplin, Missouri.

    Companies like ServiceMaster,  ServPro, Disaster Kleenup International and the Signature Group are ready to mobilize workers by the hundreds to respond to catastrophe for days and weeks on end.

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    Private-sector meteorologists are selling customized weather data to a myriad of enterprises — from agriculture to construction to transportation .

  • The wreckage of a carriage is lifted from the accident scene of the crash caused by the earlier collision of two trains on July 24, 2011 in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province of China. The accident occurred on the evening of July 23 when the D301 train, travelling from Beijing to Fuzhou, collided with the D3115 train, travelling from Hangzhou to Fuzhou, which had stalled on the line after a suspected lightening strike. The first four coaches of D301 fell off the viaduct while the 15th and 16th coaches o

    After days of growing public fury over last month’s high-speed train crash and the government’s reaction, Chinese authorities have enacted a virtual news blackout on the disaster except for positive stories or information officially released by the government. The NYT reports.

  • There are many ways one could gauge the danger of driving in a particular city, but this list uses the cities with the greatest number of vehicular deaths as a barometer of the danger level. U.S. cities with a population of 150,000 or more were up for consideration, using the most recent motor vehicle crash data available from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System and General Estimates System.One particular region of the country, the South, is ov

    Which cities are the most dangerous to drive in? Click to see the 15 cities that ranked the worst for fatalities per 100,000 population.

  • Airplane on runway

    Sharply divergent climate change policies on opposite sides of the Atlantic are setting off political fireworks as European environmental regulators prepare to extend their reach across the ocean. Starting Jan. 1, the European Union will require all carriers entering or leaving its airports to either reduce their emissions or pay a charge — whether the airline is United, Air France or Lufthansa.

  • While inconsistent and bumpy, the U.S. economy is slowly showing signs of improvement, Ryder System CEO Gregory Swienton told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The wreckage of a carriage is lifted from the accident scene of the crash caused by the earlier collision of two trains on July 24, 2011 in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province of China. The accident occurred on the evening of July 23 when the D301 train, travelling from Beijing to Fuzhou, collided with the D3115 train, travelling from Hangzhou to Fuzhou, which had stalled on the line after a suspected lightening strike. The first four coaches of D301 fell off the viaduct while the 15th and 16th coaches o

    In the last year and a half, many rail experts in China have warned that the country’s rush to build the world’s longest and fastest high speed rail network in record time was a recipe for disaster. The FT reports.

  • WOTS Now: UPS vs. FDX

    The Fast Money traders weigh in on shipping companies, automakers and copper, and analysis on energy earnings, with Fadel Gheit, Oppenheimer & Co.

  • Passengers are pictured at Check-In desks at London's Heathrow airport.

    On Friday, Congress failed to approve the extension of a bill to keep the Federal Aviation Administration running. This mean the agency can no longer impose the various federal taxes that airlines add to the price of each ticket. Instead of passing this savings on to consumers, many airlines are keeping rates the same and pocketing the difference, the New York Times reports.

  • Rescue operations continue on the wreckages of two high-speed trains that collided in the town of Shuangyu, on the outskirts of Wenzhou in the eastern Chinese province of Zhejiang on July 24, 2011.

    A deadly train accident in eastern China has added to a national sense of unease that safety  may have been sacrificed in the country’s rush to modernize.  The NYT reports.

  • Union Pacific expects to ship more coal, farm commodities and other products in the second half of the year, at higher prices if the economy allows, CEO Jim Young said Thursday.

  • Union Pacific's Record Q2

    The economic bellwether is trading higher after reporting a record Q2 earnings. Insight on what this indicates for the overall economy, with Jim Young, Union Pacific chairman/CEO.

  • AMR Contracting Boeing &Airbus

    Insight on AMR's largest order in history, with Jason Gursky, Citi defense analyst and CNBC's Phil LeBeau.

  • AMR Results & Historic Fleet Order

    This is about transforming our fleet so we'll have the youngest fleet in the industry. Discussing the airline's Q2 results and its historic aircraft order, with Thomas Horton, AMR Corp. & American Airlines president.

  • Airline Earnings in Flight

    Major airlines are out to report this week. A look ahead of the results, with Helane Becker, Dahlman Rose and CNBC's Phil LeBeau.