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Archive Transportation: Leisure

  • businessman_airplane_laptop_200.jpg

    Business travel is rebounding to pre-recession levels. But with rising travel prices, companies still look to control spending and some require the use of mandated travel programs. Others encourage a network of preferred airlines, hotels and rental car companies.

  • US Airways planes

    A US Airways jetliner flying from Paris to Charlotte, N.C., diverted to Bangor, Maine Tuesday because of what an airline spokesman described as a "security issue."

  • SpaceX Launches Rocket to Supply International Space Station

    Private space company SpaceX launched its "Falcon 9" rocket today. CNBC's Jane Wells discusses which defense companies face government cuts this year, and Jeff Kilburg, Kilburg Capital, weighs in on how to play the sector.

  • Allegiant Air

    Airlines reserve a growing number of seats to passengers willing to pay for premium locations or hold them back for their best customers. But this often separates families. Road warriors can help out families this busy summer travel period.

  • Suitcase on bed in hotel room.

    From checkpoint-friendly laptop bags to solid shampoo bars, there's a host of products available to take the pain out of restrictions imposed by airport security and airlines alike.

  • Delta Airlines

    Delta Air Lines may have charged some frequent flyers higher airfares than other customers for almost three weeks because of a website glitch. The problem was fixed, but could it happen again?

  • airport-crowd-200.jpg

    Memorial Day weekend marks the start of the busy summer travel period. Airports and flights will be packed. But what do you do if you're bumped off your flight? It's important to know your rights.

  • Comfort Suites

    Comfort Inn is on a mission to improve customer satisfaction and be more competitive. Upgrades to furniture, fixtures, equipment and check-in areas are underway.

  • Suitcase on bed in hotel room.

    Americans are still cautious about summer travel plans, according to three surveys released this week, USA Today reports. Especially hard hit are early baby boomers.

  • Avis rental car

    As the busy summer car-rental season begins, prices are forecast to spike, The New York Times reports. Here are some tips for keeping costs down.

  • Virgin Atlantic

    On some Virgin Atlantic planes, you'll be able to phone home in the air, USA Today says. Will it ruin the cabin experience?

  • Henry Kissinger

    Henry Kissinger, the jet-setting diplomat who invented shuttle diplomacy, reportedly had to go through a full pat-down before a flight to Toronto at New York's LaGuardia Airport.

  • In these tough market conditions, it could be said that no private jet model is 100 per cent safe. But this has not stopped new types of private jet travel emerging.

  • Lightning Hits French President Hollande's Plane

    France's new president Francois Hollande takes office today, but on his way to meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Berlin, his plane was struck by lightning and forced to return to Paris. CNBC's Sue Herera reports.

  • British Airways

    Roomy seats, smiling service, no lines, warm cookies. A frugal traverler — The New York Times' Frugal Traveler — gets to sit in business class and finds out what the fuss is all about.

  • The mean amount of time spent commuting by U.S. workers is 23.8 minutes, according to a from the Census Bureau. At first glance, that doesn’t seem so bad. It’s enough time to hear the weather report, drink some coffee and listen to “Free Bird” on the radio. But that figure also signifies that the average U.S. worker is in a car for almost four hours a week. That’s 45 minutes longer than it takes to watch “Titanic.”With that kind of time on the road a regular fixture in commuters’ lives, the car

    Kelley Blue Book has provided CNBC.com with its list of 10 cars that are the best for commuting. Check out the list.

  • Heathrow International Airport

    A report that white airline passengers are being discriminated against by British border officials is the latest bit of bad press for UK airports as the Olympics loom, USA Today says.

  • Passengers are pictured at Check-In desks at London's Heathrow airport.

    Even the most veteran of business travelers can inadvertently end up on the wrong flight — and in the wrong city. It's embarrassing, fouls up meetings and can potentially cost a company money.

  • Overweight passenger

    The recent trend toward obesity has safety officials worried that airplane seats are not strong enough to protect overweight passengers, The New York Times reports.

  • Herbjorn Hansson returns to "Mad Money" for a chat with Cramer.