Archive Transportation: Leisure

  • As investors look for bargains in the stock markets and consumers look for deals that won't lighten wallets as much, Kevin O'Brien, president and CEO of Revere Data, suggests investors look into the food, living arrangement, apparel and transportation sectors.

  • Gm Building

    In a glimmer of light in a mostly downbeat economy, G.M. and the United Automobile Workers union have agreed to give the plant here a second chance as part of a tentative new labor contract. It is highly unusual for an automaker to bring jobs back to a factory all but left for dead, and several G.M. plants, including Spring Hill, will be adding work that had been headed to Mexico,  the New York Times reports.

  • Tale of Two Trucks: CMI vs. NAV

    Mad Money host Jim Cramer says despite the insanity of this market investors need to look at what individual companies have to say, and when it comes to the truck business, don't take your cues from a loser like Navistar, especially when Cummins offers a best of breed.

  • United Auto Workers' Contract

    CNBC's Phil LeBeau is watching the United Auto Workers' contract with U.S. automakers as it is set to expire at midnight tonight.

  • UPS CEO Tackles the Economy

    UPS is changing the way consumers receive their packages and in the process hopes to gain market share. Scott David, UPS CEO discusses the shipping company's new plan and its future growth outlook.

  • United Continental Merger: One Year Later

    Weighing in on the cost of Hurricane Irene, flyer miles card programs, and what's next for the airline one year after its merger with Continental has been approved, with Jeff Smisek, United Continental Holdings president/CEO, who says by Spring 2012, the merger will be complete and operate fully as one airline.

  • BMW Open: State of Industry

    "We are in line with sales expectations," says Jim O'Donnell, BMW North America president, who says BMW is performing slightly better than the marketplace because of new products. He also adds that the company is responding to the needs of the marketplace, including more fuel-efficient vehicles.

  • The global auto industry crossed an important threshold last year when the number of cars on the world’s roads surpassed one billion. This year, despite the growing economic gloom, worldwide car sales increased 5 percent in the first half of the year, according to Scotiabank.While sales have slowed in the developed world, emerging markets continue to grow rapidly. Russia, for example, posted a 27 percent jump in July car sales from a year earlier.That difference in growth rates is changing the s

    We’ve put together a list of the world’s 10 biggest auto markets based on forecasted new light-vehicle sales for 2011 from the consulting firm J.D. Power and Associates.

  • Whenever parents put on amateur Santa Claus hats and try to choose toys for their children, they’re often in for a difficult task with several volatile factors. Will the toy make loud, irritating noises? Is it too expensive? Does it have small parts that are destined to be lost forever under the couch?While choosing toys for a child poses many challenges, designing them presents even more. Will it be sold in an eye-catching package? Is it a tie-in with a movie that nobody wanted to see? Will it

    Companies that have dominated the toy market have sometimes rolled out products that may have seemed like a joke to potential buyers. Here are a few examples.

  • When it comes to leaf-peeping, the longtime champion New England tends to sweep the awards by default. Of course, tree leaves make their seasonal color changes in other parts of the country, too. (Though you likely won’t see as many maple products, cider, cider doughnuts, centuries-old stone walls, or endearing New Englandahs along the way!)Fortunately, beauty-seekers all over the country can still on head out for a fall drive. The local tree line might be mostly evergreens, but even a few conif

    This list of the best fall drives across the country, provided by AAA New York, features 10 routes, along with the sights, attractions, and activities to be found along the way.

  • GM

    GM says its sales for the month of August were up 18.2 percent from the same time last year. However, that figure is down from estimates of 19.9 percent.

  • What makes a perfect suburb? We’re not talking about suspicious, “Stepford Wives” perfect. No, for this list, we consulted the data and analysis company Location, Inc., makers of the consumer reference site . The analysts used their bank of databases to find the suburbs that had the best mix of affordable housing, good schools, educated neighbors, low crime, employment and reasonable commutes. Dr. Andrew Schiller of NeighborhoodScout explains why these good suburbs are so hard to find: “American

    We consulted Location, Inc. to find suburbs that had the best mix of affordable housing, good schools, educated neighbors, low crime, employment and reasonable commutes.

  • Flooding in Vermont

    Loss estimates from Hurricane Irene continued to fall and ratings agencies said insurers would have no problem with claims, helping boost insurance industry shares Wednesday.

  • Car Pooling: Ford & Zipcar Partnership

    CNBC's Phil LeBeau has the story on Ford and Zipcar's partnership. Ford will supply Focus models with the latest technology.

  • A young couple from Germany rest on a cot at LaGuardia Airport August 29, 2011 in New York.

    Hurricane Irene had long since passed, but a lot of people who were hoping to get on airplanes as airports in the Northeast reopened Monday were not going anywhere anytime soon, reports the New York Times.

  • A young couple from Germany rest on a cot at LaGuardia Airport August 29, 2011 in New York.

    There is no question that Hurricane Irene will have an impact on quarterly results, Dave Berger, president and CEO of JetBlue Airways, told CNBC Monday.

  • Airports Plan to Resume Flights

    CNBC's Brian Shactman has the update on travelers waiting for flights after Hurricane Irene and the cost to airlines.

  • Susan Petrella, lower left, stands near the King Neptune statue as the first wind and rain of Hurricane Irene blow in on August 27, 2011 in Virginia Beach, VA.

    The eye of Irene made its way over the New York City Sunday, rolling directly over the borough of Queens, and though the storm unleashed intense rains and heavy winds on the city, it was downgraded to a tropical storm from a hurricane.

  • A taxi passes by a warning sign on the side of the Port Authority in New York on August 28, 2011 as Hurricane Irene hits the city and the Tri State area with rain and high winds. Irene weakened to tropical storm status Sunday as it hit New York City.

    Hurricane Irene will take a very small bite out of a U.S. economy already struggling with debt and unemployment after businesses across the East Coast closed their doors ahead of the deadly storm.

  • A police officer patrols the beach next to the synthetic plank boardwalk in Spring Lake, New Jersey, which was mostly destroyed and rendered unusable by Hurricane Irene.

    Beaches along the Atlantic coast took a beating over the weekend from Hurricane Irene, which caused heavy damage to some popular seaside tourist towns while sparing others the worst of its powerful wind and waves.