Archive Transportation: Leisure

More

  • The major railroad stocks have been on a rally over the last month and CSX is due to report quarterly earnings after the closing bell. How should investors position their portfolios? Jason Seidl, director at Dahlman Rose shared his sector insights.

  • Lexus

    Consumer Reports has given the Lexus GX460 a rare "Don't Buy" warning, saying a problem that occurred during routine handling tests could lead the SUV to roll over in real-world driving.

  • A Tacoma pickup truck on the lot of a Toyota dealership.

    Five days before Toyota announced a massive recall, a U.S. company executive wrote in an internal e-mail: "We need to come clean" about accelerator problems.

  • The UAL Corporation, the parent of United Airlines, and US Airways are in talks to merge, in a potential deal that would create one of the world’s largest airlines, people briefed on the matter told DealBook on Wednesday.

  • Just when you think the airlines can’t charge for anything else, low-cost carrier Spirit Airlines just announced that it will charge customers for carry-on luggage, up to 45 bucks.

  • Brake and accelerator

    Long before Toyota told U.S. regulators about sticking accelerator pedals, the Japanese automaker warned its distributors throughout Europe about similar problems, documents obtained by The Associated Press show.

  • Passengers are pictured at Check-In desks at London's Heathrow airport.

    Airlines are now touting their summer fares to lure travelers. But what they are also introducing new fees for items and services that used to be free.

  • Renault Nissan and Daimler will focus on small and energy-efficient passenger cars in their newly-announced partnership, the chief executives of the companies said Wednesday.

  • A Tacoma pickup truck on the lot of a Toyota dealership.

    Long before Toyota told U.S. regulators about sticking accelerator pedals, the Japanese automaker warned its distributors throughout Europe about similar problems, documents obtained by The Associated Press show.

  • The Dow has inched closer to the 11,000 mark, yet some investors are still skeptical about this rally. Dan Veru, executive vice president and co-chief investment officer at Palisade Capital Management, and David Tice, bear market strategist at Federated Investors, discussed their market outlooks.

  • Here are the top 10.

  • The automotive sector was handed major setbacks during the recession, but Mike Jackson, CEO of AutoNation, said the industry is in store for a “Fat V” recovery.

  • Tustin Toyota dealership in Tustin, California.

    A top Toyota Motor executive says U.S. sales surged 40 percent in March, powered by some of its deepest discounts ever in the wake of millions of recalls.

  • The Nissan Leaf

    Nissan Motor said Tuesday its new electric car will cost just over $25,000 in the U.S., a move that could force rivals to lower prices on similar vehicles.

  • Consumer confidence is coming back, John Mendel, executive vice president of auto sales at Honda Motor told CNBC.

  • Toyota

    Toyota will provide its key hybrid technology to Mazda under a licensing agreement reached Monday, the two companies said.

  • Anyone saving for retirement should take advantage of both 401(k)s and Individual Retirement Accounts, Cramer says, because they enjoy tax-blessed status. Still, he thinks that IRAs are better.That's because your investment choices for 401(k)s are quite limited, while IRAs let you invest any way you'd like. And to best capitalize on an IRA’s tax-preferred status, Cramer recommended high-yielding, dividend-paying stocks that offer as much safety as possible. Think master limited partnerships (als

    To best capitalize on an IRA’s tax-preferred status, Cramer recommended high-yielding, dividend-paying stocks. Read on for Cramer's 5 Picks for Retirement Investing.

  • General Motors says it will make another $1.2 billion in loan repayments to the U.S. and Canadian governments by the end of this month.

  • Alan Mulally

    Ford Motor President and CEO Alan Mulally made $17.9 million last year, about 1 percent more than the previous year, as the company struggled through the worst U.S. auto sales market in decades, the AP reported.

  • A company isn’t legit just because it’s publicly traded.