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  • White House and Treasury officials are now talking about turning government TARP loans into common stock for the 19 biggest banks. It’s clearly a backdoor path to nationalization, as Uncle Sam would be the largest shareholder in these institutions. What’s more, it’s not at all clear that the administration will even let certain banks pay down their TARP loans.

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    President Obama’s top economic advisers have determined that they can shore up the nation’s banking system without having to ask Congress for more money any time soon, , the New York Times reported.

  • Big news today for the banks: The White House and Treasury announced that the economic stress-test results for the 19 largest banks will in fact be made public on May 4.

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    The United Auto Workers union has placed concession talks with General Motors on the back burner as it tries to reach a deal with Chrysler before an April 30 government deadline, two people briefed on the negotiations said Thursday.

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    The  Obama administration will disclose details about its banking stress tests and what capital participants may need beginning next week, CNBC has learned.

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    Bank lending to consumers and businesses for many types of loans fell in February despite the billions of dollars in government support the banks received.

  • left/CNBC/Sections/News_And_Analysis/_Blogs/Guest_Blog/__COVER/fratto_t_100_2.jpg1100100010lefttruehttp://msnbcmedia.msn.comfalse1Pfalsefalse I can't stress this enough: the idea of publicly releasing big bank stress test results — in any form — is, well... distressing.

  • That’s the heartland tea-party message to Washington. Is bailout nation about to strike again? Sure looks like it. According to a bunch of front-page news stories, life-insurance companies are about to get TARPed. This is nuts.

  • GM Bailout

    The Treasury Department is directing General Motors to lay the groundwork for a bankruptcy filing by a June 1 deadline, despite GM's public contention that it could still reorganize outside court, the New York Times reports.

  • All stocks benefit now that toxic assets no longer threaten the financial sector’s balance sheets. Here’s why.

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    For the last eight weeks, nearly 200 federal examiners have labored inside some of the nation’s biggest banks to determine how those institutions would hold up if the recession deepened, the New York Times reported.

  • Is bailout nation about to strike again? Sure looks like it. According to this morning’s front-page Wall Street Journal story, life-insurance companies are about to get TARPed. This is nuts.

  • Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner

    Federal and state officials say they are cracking down on mortgage modification scams that target the Obama administration's efforts to make home loans more affordable

  • Luckily for investors, the news isn’t yet priced into stocks. That means it is time to buy.

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    Four small banks became the first to return millions of dollars of emergency aid, and more may soon follow as the industry tries to escape what it considers the onerous conditions attached to the government’s money.

  • Contract

    The depth of the recession and the use of taxpayer dollars to bail out companies have made it politically acceptable for overseers to tinker with employment agreements.

  • Economist Nouriel Roubini thinks Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's plan to rescue America's banks is good, but not a cure-all.

  • President Obama and Tim Geithner

    To really understand Washington’s new power structure, you need to look beyond the limelight to a group of below-the-radar appointees who will be implementing President Obama’s economic and business agendas.

  • Treasury Building

    President Barack Obama announced Saturday he would nominate three new people for positions at the Treasury Department.

  • Treasury Secretary, Henry Paulson

    "This book will be my account of our challenges as first responders in dealing with a once- or twice-in-100 years global credit crisis, armed with imperfect information and limited powers," says Henry Paulson about the book he is planning to write for the Fall.