Bonds Treasurys

  • Initial Jobless Claims Up 16,000 to 360,000

    CNBC's Rick Santelli breaks down this week's unemployment numbers and June's import prices, which fell 0.2 percent. And, Bob Brusca FAO Economics, weighs in on the data and what it indicates about the health of the economy.

  • Bernanke in No Hurry to Raise Rates

    Robert Barbera, Johns Hopkins Center for Financial Economics, discusses the latest buzz from the Fed and how its policies are impacting the markets.

  • Deciphering the FOMC Minutes

    Jim O'Sullivan, High Frequency Economics, and Ed Keon, Quantitative Management Associates, discuss the Fed's exit strategy and its impact on the markets.

  • Reading the Fed's Smoke Signals

    Greg Ip, "The Economist"; Dan Colarusso, Reuters, and David Kelly, JP Morgan Funds, discuss the implications of the Fed keeping interest rates low and winding down its bond-buying program.

  • Market To Keep Obsessing Over Fed: Pro

    David Bloom, Global Head of Foreign Exchange Strategy at HSBC says the markets will keep the taper tantrum alive, despite Ben Bernanke's supportive comments overnight.

  • Is It All About the Fed?

    Minutes before the markets close, Mark Spellman, Value Line Funds; and Chris Hyzy, U.S. Trust, discuss the markets, Fed, and expectations for earnings.

  • Reaction to the Fed Minutes

    Is the job market and economy strong enough to scale back bond purchases? Greg Ip, CNBC contributor; David Jones, DMJ Advisors; and Mark Olson, Treliant Risk Advisors discuss today's release of the fed minutes.

  • The Fed's 'Burning All the Wood' Say Santelli

    CNBC's Rick Santelli talks with Holman Jenkins Jr., WSJ columnist, about the negative consequences of using artificially low interest to run the economy.

  • Santelli's Morning Bond Update

    CNBC's Rick Santelli discusses the latest action in the bond market, and the U.S. dollar.

  • Are We Approaching a New 'Age of Separatism?'

    Peter Fisher, BlackRock Investment Institute, takes a look at how diverging economies, policies and currencies are impacting global markets.

  • Most Hated Bull Market Ever?

    Alan Gayle, Ridgeworth Capital Management; Michael Santoli, Yahoo! Finance; CNBC.com's Jeff Cox; and CNBC's Rick Santelli break down the markets after the closing bell.

  • Where is the Summer Swoon?

    With markets steadily in the green, the summer swoon we have experienced in previous years is absent. Is 2013 the lucky year? CNBC contributor Gina Sanchez, and John Butters, Fact-Set, weigh in.

  • Bounce in Bonds Ahead?

    CNBC's Rick Santelli speaks with Ray Stone of Stone & McCarthy on the outlook for bonds and whether investors are too bearish near-term on fixed income.

  • Santelli's Morning Bond Update

    CNBC's Rick Santelli discusses the latest action in the bond market, and the U.S. dollar.

  • Fed Tapering May Begin Sooner Than Anticipated: Pro

    With the U.S. recovery on track, Tim Condon, Head of Research, Asia at ING Financial Markets shares his thoughts on when the U.S central bank could start withdrawing its stimulus program.

  • 'Wake Up and Smell the Taper': Economist

    Michael Feroli, JPMorgan Bank, explains why he believes June's employment report will likely lead to the Fed slowing its asset-buying program in September.

  • Santelli's Morning Bond Update

    CNBC's Rick Santelli discusses the latest action in the bond market, and the U.S. dollar.

  • Cashin: The Market Rotation You Want to See

    Since the yield on 10-year Treasurys hit a bottom, this key index has performed well, and it tells you something about the broader economy, said Art Cashin, director of floor operations for UBS Financial Services.

  • What Happens 'When the Money Runs Out?'

    Stephen King, HSBC chief global economist, explains how the current stagnation of Western economies may lead to a serious crisis in the near future.

  • The Indian rupee has been plunging for more than a month, spreading fear of a crisis. The key issue now is whether Indian equities will see major outflows as well, analysts say.