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Bonds Treasurys

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  • Market Correlations at 'Nosebleed Levels': Analyst Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 6:56 AM ET
    Close-up of a pen on stock price chart

    The current political turmoil may put technical levels for stocks at risk, Philippe Gijsels, the head of research at BNP Paribas Fortis Global Markets in Brussels, told CNBC.com in an interview Thursday.

  • If US Defaults, Stocks Fall 30%, GDP 5%: Credit Suisse Thursday, 28 Jul 2011 | 2:56 AM ET
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    In the very unlikely event that the United States defaults on its debt obligations, the country's economy would contract by 5 percent and stocks would fall by nearly a third, according to Credit Suisse.

  • Asian Investors Wrestle With US Crisis Risk Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 11:23 PM ET
    Traders sit at their desks at the Stock Exchange in Hong Kong.

    If Asia’s equity and bond markets are any guide, then investors seem pretty sanguine about the risks of the US Treasury running out of cash or the eurozone debt crisis spinning out of control. The FT reports.

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    The debt feud will likely continue to take its toll on markets Thursday, as the deadline to raise the debt ceiling closes in and lawmakers are still far apart.

  • Trades For a Stressed-Out Dollar Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 4:38 PM ET
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    Other than a short rally today, the dollar's been taking it on the chin as Washington squabbles. Here's how to trade it.

  • What a Downgrade Would Mean for the Dollar Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 4:13 PM ET
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    Even a debt deal may not prevent a rating cut for U.S. debt. Here's what it would mean for the dollar, and what you can do.

  • What Happens If the US Is Downgraded? Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 3:59 PM ET
    Politicians in Washington, D.C. finally agreed on a deal that would extend the ability of the government to borrow money beyond August—preventing a default on  or other obligations.But even with the U.S. debt ceiling raised, a short-term deal that does little to raise revenue or cut spending might result in a downgrade of the country's long-term debt. Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s might decide that the failure to produce a longer-term solution to the U.S. debt burden indicates that the country's

    You might be surprised by some of the possible answers. Click ahead to see what happens if the U.S. credit rating is downgraded.

  • Paul Krugman

    There's been a lot of talk about how the Fed is caught in a liquidity trap, unable to use conventional monetary policy to stimulate the economy. The more I think about the possibility of the Treasury using its implicit overdraft facility with the Fed, the more apparent it is to me that Keynesians should love this.

  • An Interview With S&P's Global Head of Sovereign Ratings Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 11:03 AM ET

    Last night, I spoke with David Beers, head of S&P's sovereign debt rating committee on CNBC’s Kudlow Report. He made it very clear: the U.S. must take steps to lower its debt/GDP trend over the long run.

  • Triple-A Rating: What the US Can Learn From Japan Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 6:07 AM ET
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    Analysts at Barclays Capital expect the United States to lose its AAA credit rating as a compromise plan is passed by Congress that leads S&P to cut its rating on US debt.

  • If Tea Party Likes a Debt Deal, It Can't Pass: Economist Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 3:40 AM ET
    U.S. Minority Leader Rep. John Boehner

    As the high risk-game of chicken over raising the US debt ceiling draws closer to possible economic collision, one economist is warning that any deal that wins approval from the right-wing Tea Party movement will pass neither the Senate nor the president.

  • Want 1950's Taxes? Accept 1950's Spending: Analyst Wednesday, 27 Jul 2011 | 2:22 AM ET
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    As the debate over raising the debt ceiling in the United States lurches onward, one analyst tells CNBC that if America wants to keep taxing its people like it's the 1950’s, it will need to significantly cut back on spending.

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    Washington's political paralysis around critical debt and budgetary issues will most certainly weigh on financial markets Wednesday.

  • As Congress Kicks Can, It Also Kicks Dollar Tuesday, 26 Jul 2011 | 6:07 PM ET
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    U.S. politicians, in the process of kicking the proverbial debt can down the road, are also giving the dollar a good swift kick.

  • Can The Treasury Department Really Run Out of Money? Tuesday, 26 Jul 2011 | 4:14 PM ET
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    The White House insists the U.S. government will not be able to stay current on all of its obligations as of Aug. 2 unless the debt ceiling is raised. But can the government of the United States ever really run out of money?

  • McCullough: The Debt Debate and American Pride Tuesday, 26 Jul 2011 | 3:40 PM ET
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    "There's an uneasy stability in the market. I don't think the politicians should take that as any type of green light to allow this to continue," says one bond pro.

  • How Reagan Would Have Handled Debt: Ex-Advisor Tuesday, 26 Jul 2011 | 5:39 AM ET
    President Ronald Reagan watches as British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher speaks November 16, 1988 in Washington, DC.

    One of Ronald Reagan's best-known advisors on economics told CNBC that the former President would have started negotiations much earlier than President Barack Obama has.

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    Debt talks will again dominate Tuesday, as markets increasingly worry political cat fighting will lead to a weak deficit reduction deal, causing the U.S. to lose its top-notch credit rating.

  • US Image in China Already Tarnished by Debt Fight Monday, 25 Jul 2011 | 5:22 PM ET
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    In the eyes of China, the biggest foreign holder of US Treasuries, the damage to America's reputation as steward of the world’s safest asset may already be done—even if a last-minute agreement to raise the debt ceiling is hatched.