Jobs Unemployment

  • Market Outlook

    The week's top business news and investment advice, including whether you should short financials, and which tech names are smart buys, with CNBC's Brian Sullivan.

  • Shoppers

    Americans are growing increasingly doubtful about direction of the US economy, according to the latest survey from business-advisory firm AlixPartners

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    Imagine that you are sitting in your house, watching flood waters rise, fearing that your house could be washed away and the government walks in and says, “here’s our plan to save your house - we are going to add more water to the flood.” After realizing this was not a joke, you would run, not walk, to find higher ground and kiss your house goodbye.

  • Protecting Your Portfolio

    How to best protect your portfolio in a weakening economy, with Jason Pride, Glenmede; Jonathan Corpina, Meridian Equity Partners; Michael Cuggino, Permanent Portfolio Funds, and CNBC's Steve Liesman.

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    Safe-haven currencies are on a roll. Yes, it's the economy, stupid — time for your FX Fix.

  • May Jobs Report: Unemployment at 9.1%

    CNBC's Steve Liesman has the breakdown of the lackluster jobs data for May.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Portuguese Prime Minister Jose Socrates speaks during a press conference at Sao Bento Palace in Lisbon. Socrates warned his political opponents not to provoke a political crisis over planned austerity measures to solve the country's debt crisis.

    Portugal goes to the polls on Sunday looking to elect a government that will lead them through an austerity package mandated by the European Union and International Monetary fund; but whoever wins will need to defy the electorate and introduce unpopular policies.

  • Unemployment line

    The government posts the monthly jobs number, Wal-Mart hosts unhappy shareholders and the President toasts his mutually happy divorce with Chrysler. Here's what we're watching...

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    The economy's shift into low gear likely made for a worrisome decline in job growth in May.Economists forecast nearly 100,000 fewer jobs were added in May than in April, which had job growth of 244,000.

  • Job seekers wait in line to have their résumés reviewed at the second annual Anaheim/Orange County Job Fair.

    After steady job creation in February and March, the average number of net new jobs slipped in May from 0.17 per independent business to 0.01, according to survey results from the National Federation of Business.

  • It all turns on the criteria that make up the ten categories in our point system and this year has brought some interesting changes. Here's the rundown.

  • Weekly Jobless Claims

    Anticipating the next round of jobless claims and what the numbers will signal for the US economy, with Jim Iuorio, TJM Institutional Services; Ethan Harris, BofA Merrill Lynch Global Research; and CNBC's Steve Liesman & Rick Santelli.

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    The Greek people's reaction to the implemented austerity measures should not be ignored, warned Alastair Newton, managing director and senior political analyst at Nomura.

  • Barack Obama

    No American president since Franklin Delano Roosevelt has won a second term in office when the unemployment rate on Election Day topped 7.2 percent.

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    The latest numbers for UK manufacturing showed a continued weakening, prompting concerns that the economic recovery is likely to be more protracted than forecasts have suggested.

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    One fund manager calls it a horror show, others are predicting the Federal Reserve will have to extend its unconventional measures and stocks across the world are falling heavily.

  • Unemployment line

    Economists also slashing second-quarter U.S. GDP forecasts to the 2 percent range but have not changed the second-half outlook yet. A big concern is that if the markets remain rocky, or the negatives start really denting sentiment, the slowdown could become self-fulfilling.

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    The hallmark of the American labor market, and consequently the wider economy, has long been the mobility of our work force. From "going West" to "teleworking," we go where the jobs are. Unfortunately the uniquely disastrous state of the current housing market is changing all that.

  • Interest rates

    Bad news on the economic front is ironically pushing interest rates lower than the Fed's quantitative easing program managed to.