×

Jobs Unemployment

  • Carly Fiorina Gets America Back to Work

    One good report does not make a recovery. Discussing the employment report and how to create jobs, with Carly Fiorina, former HP CEO.

  • The U.S. government must tackle long-term structural changes in the tax system to promote stronger growth, Carly Fiorina told CNBC Friday.

  • LinkedIn is "in the very early stages of a large opportunity" to expand membership in the U.S. and around the world as uncertainty over getting and keeping a job continues.

  • President Obama: Things Will Get Better

    President Obama discusses the tumultuous state of the economy and the need to create jobs.

  • Allianz Not Worried About Italy

    "We are not worried about Italy, we think this is a panic and unfounded fear," Oliver Baethe, chief financial officer at Allianz told CNBC. He added Allianz's exposure to the peripheral debt was now "fairly limited." "We have about 5 billion euros in exposure to the peripheral countries, the largest one of that left is Spain. On all the other ones its much smaller the net unrealised losses on all of the periphery portfolio is around 700 million," he said.

  • job_fair_line.jpg

    Before getting too excited about the modest uptick in net job creation and a slight downward move in the unemployment rate, it’s probably worth a look under the hood.

  • LinkedIn's Profit & Jobs Connection

    The social networking website swings to a second quarter profit in its first earnings report since going public almost three months ago. Insight with Jeff Weiner, LinkedIn CEO.

  • Behind the Violent Sell-Off

    Making sense of the global sell-off, with Mohamed Ed-Erian, PIMCO CEO/co-CIO.

  • Jobs Report: Up 117,000

    A breakdown of the July employment report. The numbers shows unemployment down to 9.1 percent and non-farm employment is up 117,000 in July vs. 46,000 in June. Insight with Mark Zandi, Moody's Analytics; Diane Swonk, Mesirow Financial; Mark Olson, Treliant Risk Advisors, and CNBC's Rick Santelli.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • A home is advertised for sale at a foreclosure auction in Pasadena, California.

    The housing bubble and its subsequent ripple effects on consumers and financial institutions are at the top of the list. The direct economic impact from 12.5 million foreclosures is something the US has not experienced.

  • Unemployment is still high and the economy uncertain, but job seekers aren't giving up—they're logging on, said Gary Swart, CEO of oDesk, an online freelancing site for contract workers.

  • Weekly Jobless Claims: 400,000

    Breaking down the numbers, which came in as expected, with Peter Yastrow, Pastrow Origer and CNBC's Rick Santelli.

  • Hire Expectations

    A look ahead of tomorrow's jobs report, with Matt Ferguson, CareerBuilder CEO, who says 60 percent of workers laid off last year have a new job.

  • Surfing for a Salary: Freelance Markets

    Weighing in on the online contracting job market, with Gary Swart, oDesk CEO, who says companies are looking for talent outside their local market.

  • Is the Macro Picture Doomed?

    Discussing whether the U.S. economy is headed for a double dip, with Ward McCarthy, Jefferies.

  • Out of Work

    Private sector payrolls rose at a faster pace than expected in July, but a surprising increase in layoffs helped push the number of announced  jobs cuts to a 16-month high, separate reports showed.

  • ADP Numbers: Up 114,000 Private Sector

    A breakdown of the July employment numbers, with Joel Prakken, Macroeconomic Advisers; CNBC's Steve Liesman & Rick Santelli.

  • Challenger Report: Visible Signs of Stalling Economy

    July job cuts were the highest monthly total since March 2010, says John Challenger, Challenger, Gray & Christmas CEO, who says major cuts have been made in iconic organizations in strong areas like technology, pharmaceuticals and retail.

  • Dr. Marc Faber

    The bear market is on its way back, economist and contrarian investor Marc Faber, the editor and publisher of The Gloom Boom & Doom Report told CNBC Tuesday.