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    Warwick Castle – situated in the center of England and promoting itself as ‘Britain’s Ultimate Castle’ - is currently recruiting for a Consultant Dragonologist.

  • Nuclear Power Plant

    As Japan’s nuclear crisis intensified Wednesday, governments across Europe remained at odds over whether to scale back nuclear power programs or continue plans to expand, reports the New York Times.

  • UNITED KINGDOM - JULY 01: Photo of Bob MARLEY; Bob Marley performing live on stage at the Brighton Leisure Centre, (Photo by Mike Prior/Redferns)

    At the London Olympics in 2012, the public will have plenty of reason to keep their eye on Jamaica's track and field team.

  • From country to country around the world, people’s relationship with alcohol varies greatly. In some places it serves as a point of national identity, and in others it has become detrimental to a country's overall health. Recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) released on the global status of alcohol, in order to help countries combat the harmful use of alcohol and avoid negative health and social consequences. Along with data on estimated cost of alcohol abuse, drinking ages and drunk-dr

    Around the world, people’s relationship with alcohol varies greatly. In some places it is a point of national identity, in others it has become detrimental to a country's overall health.

  • Paul Hawtin

    Kate Kelly goes one-on-one with the two key players behind an ambitious new UK hedge fund launching in early April, which is promising its investors outsized returns using millions of random tweets to predict changes in the stock market.

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    Last fall, Indiana University informatics professor Johan Bollen stumbled upon an astonishing connection:  That the social network Twitter could predict swings in the Dow Jones Industrial Average with 87 percent accuracy. 

  • Cash Register

    The West is poorly positioned to handle this latest oil price scare. The buffers which typically limit downside economic risks are no longer working.

  • secretary_intern_200.jpg

    Experience tells us that when employees are unhappy they look for new jobs. But what if that’s no longer true? What if, for a variety of reasons, dissatisfied employees are staying with their companies?

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    U.S. energy supplier PPL Corp is close to a $6 billion cash deal to buy the UK electricity grid distribution business of E.ON AG, according to people close to the deal.

  • European Central Bank

    Many economists think he should be the next person to run the European Central Bank. But among government leaders in Berlin and Paris, where many of Europe’s most important decisions are made, Mario Draghi, the governor of the Bank of Italy, generates a palpable lack of enthusiasm, reports the New York Times.

  • Prince William and Kate Middleton

    Royal weddings can generally be counted on to produce plenty of pomp and circumstance, not to mention — later on, of course — a possible future king or queen. In Britain, the approaching wedding of Prince William, second in line to the throne, to Kate Middleton, his longtime girlfriend, comes with a whole new set of expectations. The NYT reports.

  • Asian Couple Embracing in Front of New Home

    As Chinese property prices skyrocket and with cooling measures put in place, more and more mainland buyers are finding more value in overseas markets.

  • greece_athens_academy_2_200.jpg

    A new law devised to help Greece crack down on tax cheats is only one of the many efforts Greek authorities have made over the past year to change what has long been a way of life in this country — rampant tax evasion. But so far, to little avail. The New York Times reports.

  • On April 6, 2011, Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is scheduled to stand trial for charges stemming from his relationship with Karima el-Mahroug, a nightclub dancer who performs under the name Ruby Heart-Stealer. According to the charges, he paid el-Mahroug for sex while she was still underage, and when she was arrested for theft, he used his political muscle to have her released from police custody. Berlusconi has been in this type of trouble before, but it’s widely speculated that this

    Click to see international political scandals that raised eyebrows and kept the tabloids in wide circulation.

  • Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts.  Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, reports the New York Times.

  • Spain

    Spanish savings banks, which have been ordered to raise more capital by the government, are facing an uphill struggle to persuade investors to help them improve their balance sheets, reports the New York Times.

  • Global Credit Crisis

    The woes of WestLB, which has received $11 billion in taxpayer support since 2009, are symptomatic of a larger problem in the German economy. Many of its biggest banks are still on government life support after making bad lending bets during the bubble years. The New York Times reports.

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    Spiking inflation in the UK has just hit 4 percent—double the Bank of England's inflation target.

  • One of Fast Money's Pros reveals the bet hedge fund managers are making given rising global prices

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    The French financial markets regulator has begun to require hedge funds and other investment managers to disclose their short positions when they reach 0.5 percent of a company’s outstanding stock, reports the New York Times.