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Top News & Analysis United States

  • If gorgeous summer weather makes you feel like calling in sick, join the club! Nearly 20 percent of workers admit to calling in a fake sick day at least once during the summer. But let the ill beware — there's an art to the fake sick day. Read on.

  • Federal Reserve Bank Chairman Ben Bernanke

    A growing number of Federal Reserve officials have concluded that the central bank needs to expand its stimulus campaign unless the nation’s economy soon shows signs of improvement, including job growth, the New York Times reports.

  • After Hours Action: Google Spikes on Earnings

    The Fast Money traders discuss the details of Google's earnings report, with CNBC's Jon Fortt.

  • Microsoft Higher After Earnings

    The Fast Money traders discuss their trade on Microsoft since the company reported earnings; and Kimberly Forrest, Fort Pitt Capital, weighs in.

  • Wall Street is rude, it’s crude and it will eat you alive. So interviewing for a job is no different. You may be asked questions like, “How many tennis balls could you fit in this room?” or “If I told you you could have the job if you let me sleep with your girlfriend—would you accept?” You’d better have an answer—and it had better not be “I don’t know!”

  • Fast Money Web Extra: Stock Pops & Drops

    The Fast Money crew offers special CNBC.com-only advice on your investments.

  • The Capitol Building in Washington, D.C.

    The fiscal crisis for states will persist long after the economy rebounds as they confront rising health care costs, underfunded pensions, ignored infrastructure needs, eroding revenues and expected federal budget cuts, according to a report issued here Tuesday by a task force of respected budget experts, the New York Times reports.

  • Stock Pops & Drops

    The Fast Money traders take a look at today's biggest market movers.

  • Gavel

    As regulators ramp up their global investigation into the manipulation of interest rates, the Justice Department has identified potential criminal wrongdoing by big banks and individuals at the center of the scandal. The New York Times reports.

  • home-underwater-200.jpg

    The number of Americans who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth declined in the first three months of the year, aided by a modest rebound in U.S. home prices.

  • Ackman's 'Biggest Ever Active, Initial Investment'

    Dissecting the day's major business news, with the Fast Money traders. Linda Bolton Weiser of Caris & Co. provides perspective on whether Proctor & Gamble is undervalued, and Charlie Bobrinskoy of Ariel Investments discusses his firm's heavy focus on JPMorgan.

  • corporate_building_200.jpg

    Despite gloomy data out of China weighing on the outlook for U.S. earnings, U.S. equities are looking attractive for U.S. investors, Sam Peters, CIO and portfolio manager at global investment management firm Leg Mason Capital Management, told CNBC on Thursday.

  • Fast Money Web Extra: Wal-Mart & Target Working

    The Fast Money crew offers special CNBC.com-only advice on your investments.

  • Clawbacks Coming for JPMorgan?

    JPMorgan and Wells Fargo are getting set to report quarterly earnings on Friday before the opening bell. The FMHR shares their opinions on what investors can expect.

  • running_suits-200.jpg

    Traders on Wall Street are always looking for how to get an edge and pull ahead especially in this catch-a-falling knife market. The latest secret weapon isn’t some complex trade or computer algorithm, it’s something more primal — testosterone.

  • $830 Billion Worth of Advice

    Economist Nouriel Roubini said his "perfect storm" scenario is unfolding, with slowdowns in the U.S., Europe & China. Richard Madigan, JPMorgan Private Bank CIO, shares his opinions. "I think this is a miserable environment for day traders," he says.

  • Net Job Creation: 211,500 California managed to create jobs in all but two private-sector categories (manufacturing and general services) along with its solid growth rate. Gains in construction and financial activities partly reflect its improving real estate sector. High tech, tourism and international trade are the leading sectors. The state led the nation in job creation in June. Facebook and Zynga both went on hiring binges in the last year. On the negative side, as might be expected of a ca

    Overall payroll growth remains subpar and disappointing but these states, which include a few surprises, are showing healthy and diverse growth.

  • Obama's War on Romney

    Discussing whether the middle class worries they will be taxed next, if the rich are taxed, with Scott Rasmussen, Rasmussen Reports founder & president. Marc Lamont Hill, "Our World" host, and Monica Crowley, "What the (Bleep) Just Happened," author, weigh in.

  • Weak Demand Hits Chip Outlook

    Cummins plunged 9 percent today on news the company lowered its Q2 and full-year guidance today, with the FMHR traders; and Applied Micro Devices & Applied Materials both slashed their estimates yesterday, with Chris Danely, JPMorgan analyst.

  • Most expensive metro area: Juneau House: $493,167 Movie ticket: $10.50 Rent: $1,437 Doctor visit: $156.42 Gallon of gas: $3.941 T-bone steak: $10.64

    Cost of living may not be among the top criteria for a business, but it can be a big consideration for employees. Look at the cost of a variety of items in the nation's 10 most expensive states.