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  • Publisher: MicrosoftCopies sold: 2 million on the Initially conceived as a side project, the latest installment in the “Halo” franchise took on a life of its own during development. It’s a different type of game than its predecessors, with no sign of the series hero - the Master Chief. Fans snatched it up, though and critics applauded the new style of play.

    At issue isn’t whether publishers can make violent games, but whether states can impose sales restrictions on those titles—effectively declaring them to be on the same level as pornography and legally limit their sale.

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    You think of drinking whiskey and playing golf as things you do in your leisure time to unwind. But some people actually get paid to do these things. What is their day-to-day life like? What did they do to get there? Click here to read about the World's Coolest Jobs ... Ever!

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    With the Supreme Court scheduled to hear arguments later this year about whether states should be allowed to regulate the sale of violent video games, you might think game makers would consider dialing down the number of shooter titles.

  • 2010 E3 Electronic Expo

    Hardware announcements tend to get the lion's share of the spotlight at E3, but in the long run, all of those devices are just tools.  The real stars of the show are the titles that publishers have on display.

  • Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect, a gesture-recognition controller – a camera that is able to detect subtle movements and sounds from players.

    While the video game industry has its share of problems, complacency is not one of them.

  • Hollywood sign

    With the exception of sure-fire blockbusters, most gaming companies aren’t that interested lately in licensing the gaming rights of titles from film studios, having been burned too many times by titles that were critical and commercial failures.

  • Wii

    Nintendo kicked off its big E3 event with America CEO Reggie Fils-Aime singing the praises of the Wii and the DS. But the keynote comes amid multiple threats to the Nintendo juggernaut, from the likes of Microsoft and Apple. And how Nintendo responds, and how quickly, will determine whether its best days are behind it, or still ahead.

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    As Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo promote their upcoming hardware innovations, a burgeoning company called OnLive sits on the show floor of the video game industry’s trade show, sending out the message that dedicated game machines could be a thing of the past.

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    As the video game industry gathers at E3 to look forward to the holiday season and what it hopes are more prosperous times, storm clouds are gathering on the horizon that have the potential to radically change gaming in the months and years to come.

  • Scenes from the E3 Expo

    Los Angeles is under siege, with as many as 45,000 video game industry insiders and onlookers descending upon the Los Angeles Convention Center for E3—one of the loudest, glitziest—and sometimes gaudiest—trade shows of any industry.

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    Sales of software titles are down 8 percent year to date—a shortfall of more than $200 million, according to the most recent numbers from the NPD Group, which tracks video game purchases.

  • Big news from Take Two Interactive—it's sold five million copies of "Red Dead Redemption" since its May 18 debut. This blows away all projections: analysts expected the company to sell some three million copies in the entire quarter and up to five million copies for the rest of the fiscal year.

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    If the video game world were following its normal cycle, console makers would be revealing details of their next generation systems in less than two weeks. This cycle is anything but normal, though – and so at this year’s Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), game makers will instead chart a new path.

  • Robbie Bach

    Microsoft is shaking up its entertainment and devices division, the group responsible for many of its most familiar consumer devices.

  • Halo Reach

    If there’s one truth in the videogame world, it’s this: Never bet against the sales success of a new “Halo” or “Grand Theft Auto”. But as Microsoft prepares to launch “Halo: Reach” this fall, early evidence indicates people may not be betting heavily enough.

  • Alan Wake

    Stalled by the recession and companies who were initially hesitant to sink part of their advertising budgets into an untested medium, in-game advertising is coming of age—and it could finally live up to its potential as a significant revenue generator.

  • Grand Theft Auto IV

    Video game sales may have plummeted 26 percent in April, but now there's hope that a new game will get the industry moving. "Red Dead Redemption" goes on sale today, and based on rave reviews and some anecdotal reports of huge lines outside Game Stop stores, this game could be a blockbuster.

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    It seems like the NCAA doesn’t want anyone using a players’ name to make money besides them...It doesn’t seem fair that the NCAA is the only one with rights to make money off of college athletes. I think some changes need to be made to give some of the rights back to the players.

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    Apple the company, and not an individual employee, initiated the investigation into a missing iPhone prototype that found its way onto the Internet, according to the search warrant unsealed in this case earlier this morning.

  • Activision

    I spoke to Kotick in an exclusive interview — he said Activision Blizzard's more modest projections for the current quarter were due to the timing of game releases. That lack of new games is one factor behind the 22 percent drop in game sales in April from a year ago.