CNBC Anchors and Reporters

Vince Farrell

Chief Investment Officer, Soleil Securities

Prior to joining Soleil Securities, Farrell was a Principal at Scotsman, Chairman of Victory Capital Management of Cleveland and Chairman of Victory SBSF Capital Management in New York.

He was a founding partner of Spears, Benzak, Salomon & Farrell, which was acquired by KeyCorp in 1995. Farrell held a variety of positions in his 23 years at SBSF, including Chief Investment Officer, and he served as the portfolio manager on a number of the firm's largest client relationships. He is a regular guest on the cable network CNBC as well as other national print and broadcast media.

Prior to joining SBSF, Farrell spent nine years at Smith Barney, Inc. as a Vice President-Sales.

Farrell graduated from Princeton University in 1969 and received his M.B.A. from the Iona College Graduate School of Business in 1972.

Farrell is a Vice President and member of the Class Board of Governors for Princeton University - Class of 1969, and is co-Chairman of its Special Gifts Committee. He is also on the Academic Advisory Board for the history Department at Princeton. Farrell is actively involved with the Westchester Putnam Special Olympics/Association of Retarded Citizens. He was named to the Hall of Fame at Archbishop Stepinac High School, White Plains, N.Y., in 1998, and was honored by Iona College in 2003 with the Trustees' Award for Lifetime Achievement. Irish American Magazine named him as one of the 50 most influential Irish Americans in Finance in 2003. He is a Trustee of The Buonoconti Fund to Cure Paralysis.

More

  • The markets, the madness and the millionaire who wants to be the next president....as only Vince Farrell can see it.

  • euros_dollars_200.jpg

    One idea that will be enthusiastically received is to have some kind of financial transaction — tax. Taxing anything and everything financial is always a crowd pleaser. It's not like the industry hasn't asked for it.

  • "Man on Fire"

    Conflicting economic data shows it would be incorrect to forecast a recession in the US — yet, says blogger Vince Farrell.

  • recession.jpg

    We had a flash crash. Then we had a flash rally. Now we're flashing again to the downside. I think we should all go away for a few days and give it a rest.

  • Ben Bernanke press conference following rate decision.

    Big moves are not being anticipated today and, truth is, the Fed has no big moves left in its deck of cards. The Benjamin might not say anything. But there are some policy steps that could be taken, even though the benefits are modest.

  • Bernanke Testifies to Congress on U.S. Monetary Policy

    Ben cut interest rates to zero, devised a zillion bowls of "alphabet soup" rescue programs as the Wall Street Journal put it, and bought every bond put out for bid and ballooned the Fed's balance sheet by trillions. Maybe it saved us from disaster, but we haven't seen the growth expected.

  • Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during her weekly news conference at the US Capitol in Washington, DC.

    I hate to say it, but Nancy was right! I try to be apolitical. I think I succeed most of the time. Trashing both parties more or less equally allows me to stay balanced. So in that continuing effort to stay bland and uninteresting, I have to give mention to Nancy Pelosi who said a few weeks ago it might take a decline of hundreds of points in the market to get the Republicans attention.

  • Barack Obama

    To be downgraded is a national disgrace. It comes about via a political battle that should never have been fought.

  • baby_pouting_200.jpg

    What are you gonna do when the financial world is falling apart, again. This has to be the 12th or 20th (maybe 50th) time the world has ended during my career.

  • Dora the Explorer

    Feeling obligated to watch the President I tuned in for a classic "not my fault but his fault" game of dodge-responsibility. Speaker Boehner wasn't any better. I got mad watching the politicians be politicians and I got Lola Jane mad by turning off Dora.