White House Wars and Military Conflicts

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  • Will geopolitics be a big risk for 2015?

    The markets will always react to geopolitical issues due to its uncertainty, yet Hilary Kramer, president and chief investment officer at A&G Capital remains bullish, as the markets keep thriving through any big issue like Ebola or ISIS.

  • The Russian ruble in 2015

    The factors behind the decline in the Russian ruble - including sanctions and low oil prices - are likely to stay put for now, says Carlo Gallo, founder & director at Enquirisk.

  • The geopolitical storms which rocked markets in 2014 are unlikely to calm in the coming year, with a raft of warnings about a new era of instability.

  • Vladimir Putin

    The Russian railway's death toll is part of life under Putin, as the country sometimes fails to provide basic infrastructure despite prospering over the past 14 years.

  • Putin's counterproductive moves with Ukraine

    Russia's recent moves with Ukraine appear "counterproductive" says John Peet, Europe editor at "The Economist".

  • Oil volatility is going to persist: CEO

    Oil prices could drop further to $40 and market volatility is "going to persist" due to political turbulence, says Ana Cukic Armstrong, CEO of Armstrong Investment Managers.

  • People walk past boards showing currency exchange rates in Moscow, December 17, 2014.

    The Russian ruble tumbled to a one-week low on Monday, after new figures showed the country’s economy shrinking for the first time in over 5 years.

  • Firefighters work to put out a fire on an oil tank at the port of Es Sider in Ras Lanuf, Libya, Dec. 29, 2014.

    U.S. crude futures hit a new five-year low, reversing earlier gains on concerns about Libyan supply.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian President Vladimir Putin

    German leader Angela Merkel appealed to the Russian government to use its influence on separatists in eastern Ukraine.

  • Libya North Africa

    A rocket hit a tank at the eastern Libyan oil port Es Sider, officials said on Thursday.

  • Ukraine's bonds have had a terrible year as the country's conflict with Russia wears on, but could be a canny buy in 2015?

  • Ukraine's President Petro Poroshenko speaks before Congress

    Ukraine's parliament votes for the country to renounce its "nonaligned" status and work towards membership of the NATO alliance.

  • Sale signs in St. Petersburg, Russia economy

    Russia faces a “full-blown economic crisis” next year that will trigger defaults, a respected ex-finance minister has warned. The FT reports.

  • A Palestinian woman takes some of her belongings from her partially destroyed home across the street from where a high rise apartment building in Gaza City was targeted by Israeli airstrikes, Aug. 26, 2014.

    It was Israel's first airstrike on the Palestinian territory since this summer's war.

  • FBI: North Korea Gov't behind Sony attack

    The FBI have stated that North Korea's government is responsible for the Sony attack. Neil Ashdown, deputy head of Asia analysis at IHS, weighs in, saying that it's difficult to "definitively attribute" a hacking attack to a particular group or state.

  • UK PM: Must keep pressure on Russia

    At the European Union summit, sanctions on Russia is all the talk. U.K. prime minister David Cameron says the pressure must be kept on Russia while President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, stated that EU needs a consistent strategy towards Russia. CNBC's Hadley Gamble reports.

  • Grybauskaite: Putin looking for 'someone to blame'

    At the EU Summit, CNBC's Hadley Gamble discusses Vladimir Putin's "swipe" at EU leaders, whilst talking to Finland's prime minister Alexander Stubb and Lithuania's Dalia Grybauskaite about Putin's speech.

  • Pro-Russian activists seized the main administration building in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk.

    The EU banned investment in Crimea on Thursday, halting European help for Russian Black Sea oil and gas exploration.

  • Is Russia'a bear just want a 'stuffed animal'?

    Russian President Vladimir Putin says that other countries perceive Russia as a country which should just "sit quietly", rather than try and maintain its sovereignty and independence.

  • Putin: Russia must be 'protected'

    Russia's Vladimir Putin responds to Ukraine Crisis and Russia's stature compared to the rest of the world. CNBC's Geoff Cutmore reports the President's remarks.