×

Top News & Analysis Washington DC

  • A proposed settlement of a national class-action lawsuit, filed Oct. 16 in U.S. District Court in Vermont, says the government will revise its Medicare manual to make benefits available when care would only ``maintain the patient's current condition or... prevent or slow further deterioration''.

  • Scott Walker spent months and millions of dollars on ads in the divisive recall election telling Wisconsin voters that the state is on the economic upswing _ a strong dose of good news that even Mitt Romney backers acknowledge helps the incumbent, President Barack Obama.

  • *Spanish debt yields rise as Moody's downgrades 5 regions. NEW YORK, Oct 23- The euro plunged versus the yen and hit a one-week low versus the dollar on Tuesday as concerns about a global economic slowdown and a spike in Spain's borrowing costs spurred broad-based risk aversion.

  • WASHINGTON, Oct 23- Most Americans have scant understanding about their water supply, but they are concerned about it, and believe recycling water gives the United States an advantage over other countries, a survey said on Tuesday.

  • WASHINGTON-- A prominent gay Republican group offered Mitt Romney its "qualified endorsement" on Tuesday, calling it the right decision for the nation even as it slammed Romney's opposition to gay marriage.

  • WASHINGTON-- TITLE: "The Clear Path". AIRING: Mitt Romney's campaign declined to say where the ad is airing. One is a path represented by the president, which, at the end of four years, would mean we'd have $20 trillion in debt, heading towards Greece.

  • A court in the quake-devastated town of L'Aquila convicted seven former members of Italy's so-called " Great Risks Commission" and sentenced each of them to six years in prison, prompting predictions that experts would be discouraged from working in Italy for fear of similar risks of prosecution.

  • WASHINGTON-- Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan is preparing to explain to low-income voters how he and Mitt Romney would do more to help them than President Barack Obama. The Wisconsin congressman planned to outline the GOP presidential ticket's case during a speech Wednesday at Cleveland State University in political crucial Ohio.

  • NEW YORK-- In a story Oct. 17 about small business owners who are government contractors, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Amber Peebles, co-owner of a construction company, was wounded during Operation Desert Storm in 1991. Peebles, a Marine at the time, was injured in a service-related accident in the U.S. on May 13, 1991.

  • David Strickland, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, told an automotive gathering that automated vehicles are the next "evolutionary step" in safety technology. He said his agency has held extensive discussions with automakers and Google about what needs to happen before automated cars can be safely introduced to consumers.

  • Just about every U.S. taxpayer is facing a significant tax increase next year, unless Congress and the White House can agree on a plan to extend a huge collection of tax cuts that expires at the end of the year.

  • WASHINGTON _ Commerce Department releases new home sales for September, 10 a.m.. WASHINGTON _ Federal Reserve policymakers meet to set interest rates. BERLIN _ Germany's Ifo institute releases its monthly index of business confidence, a closely watched indicator for Europe's biggest economy.

  • Surprising Cities Where New Businesses Are Built

    While Silicon Valley and other traditional high-tech hubs claim dominance as places for startups, demand for health care  and other business services has put places like Indianapolis and Salt Lake City on the entrepreneurial map.

  • The risk of a devastating cyberattack on the United States is real. There's no question the country remains vulnerable to an "electronic Pearl Harbor," as debate continues on the role the federal government should play in securing computer networks that control the nation's electrical grid, water supply and other critical sectors.

  • District Judge James E. Boasberg rejected the federal government's argument that the environmental groups' lawsuit was moot because the Fish and Wildlife Service had already agreed to stop the practice after this year.

  • LIANGJIAHE, China-- The next leader of China spent much of his youth living in a dug-out cave. Xi Jingping's seven years in this remote northern community meant toiling alongside rural villagers by day and sleeping on bricks by night, in stark contrast to his pampered early years in Beijing.

  • JACKSON, Miss.-- Expanding Medicaid would bring Mississippi more federal money from 2014 through 2016 but could cost the state millions of dollars from 2017 through 2025, according to a study released Monday by the state's University Research Center.

  • NEW YORK-- New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is poised to spend $500,000 of his personal fortune on gay marriage campaigns in Maine, Minnesota and Washington state, he said Monday, following up on a major political spending push the billionaire businessman-turned-politician announced last week.

  • A divided Washington has done little to ease the misery. President Barack Obama wants to create jobs by keeping income taxes low for everyone but the wealthiest, and by spending more on public works as well as offering targeted tax breaks to businesses.

  • ROMNEY on Syria: "What I'm afraid of is we've watched over the past year or so, first the president saying, `Well, we'll let the U.N. deal with it.' And Assad _ excuse me, Kofi Annan _ came in and said we're going to try to have a cease-fire.