Enter multiple symbols separated by commas

Life Weather


  • Heat Wave May Hit Corn Crop—And Food Prices Thursday, 21 Jul 2011 | 3:51 PM ET

    If the scorching heat wave continues much longer, there could be an impact on the U.S. corn crop—and on consumer's wallets.

  • Drought Spreads Pain From Florida to Arizona Tuesday, 12 Jul 2011 | 10:37 AM ET
    RIZHAO, CHINA - JANUARY 24: (CHINA OUT) A villager inspects the drought situation on his farmland on January 24, 2011 in Rizhao, Shandong province of China. Facing shortage of water, local government plans to invest 275 million yuan, about 41.7 million US dollars, to build a set of irrigation projects, after a severe drought hit the Sandong Province covering a reported area of more than 20, 106. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images)

    Farmers with the money and equipment to irrigate are running wells dry in an unseasonably early and particularly brutal national drought that some say could rival the Dust Bowl days. The pain has spread across 14 states, from Florida, where severe water restrictions are in place, to Arizona, the New York Times reports.

  • unemployment_line5_2_2011_200.jpg

    "In addition to the shock value...we need to seriously question whether a double dip is there. I would say it's back on the table," says one strategist.

  • Australia Takes the Lead in Trading Water Sunday, 3 Jul 2011 | 10:34 PM ET

    Is water the next big investment idea? Australia is sure betting on it.  The industry is valued at up to $27 billion in Australia, while last year alone over $3 billion in water rights were traded in the open market.

  • Corn Prices, Agriculture Stocks and Your Wallet Thursday, 9 Jun 2011 | 2:26 PM ET

    Corn futures are trading near all-time highs and look to climb even higher as the U.S. crop faces tight supplies and surging demand. Here's what it means for your wallet and for some agriculture stocks.

  • China’s Nuclear Freeze to Last Until 2012 Tuesday, 7 Jun 2011 | 9:23 AM ET
    Nuclear Power Plant

    China’s freeze on new nuclear projects could last until the beginning of 2012, according to a senior industry official, underlining the gravity of China’s nuclear safety review. The FT reports.

  • Five Things to Watch: Auto Sales and More Tuesday, 31 May 2011 | 10:58 PM ET
    Steering wheel

    Raised debt ceiling rejected, May auto sales slumped and the LinkedInIPO emulated. Here's what we're watching...

  • Higher Storm Damage Could Help Insurance Stocks Monday, 23 May 2011 | 1:50 PM ET
    Residents walking down street after a tornado in Joplin, Missouri.

    It's been a stormy year for U.S. property insurers, and hurricane season hasn't even started yet. But shares of these companies could be jumping if a bad year in weather prompts premium increases.

  • Don't Fly Into Volcanic Cloud: Ryanair CEO Monday, 23 May 2011 | 3:07 AM ET
    Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary

    European airlines should be allowed to deal with the consequences of the most recent Icelandic volcano eruption themselves, Michael O’Leary, the chief executive of Ryanair told CNBC Monday.

  • Energy Falls Despite 'Above Average' Hurricane Forecast Thursday, 19 May 2011 | 1:45 PM ET

    The federal government’s main weather forecasting agency warns of an “above average” hurricane season this summer, yet the energy market yawns...

  • Rainy Day Investing: Grain Prices Expected to Rebound Tuesday, 17 May 2011 | 2:20 PM ET
    Roy Presson (C) embraces his daughters Catherine (L) and Amanda as they stand on the edge of State Highway HH looking out at their family farm on May 3, 2011 at Wyatt, Missouri. The Presson home and 2,400 acres of land that they farmed was flooded last night when the Army Corps of Engineers blew a massive hole in a levee at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to help save the town of Cairo, Illinois.

    Experts in the corn, wheat and soy markets expect the sharp pullback in recent weeks to be little more than a temporary correction as heavy rain and strong demand cause prices to rebound.

  • Scenes From The 2011 Tornadoes Thursday, 28 Apr 2011 | 3:49 PM ET
    2011 has been a tough year for US residents in areas affected by tornadoes. Most recently, Joplin, Missouri was hit by a massive tornado that is thought to be the deadliest in 60 years. Earlier in the year, dozens of massive tornadoes tore a town-flattening streak across the Southeastern U.S., killing at least 250 people in six states and forcing rescuers to carry some survivors out on makeshift stretchers of splintered debris. Although the economic losses are not yet clear, the devastation caus

    2011 has been a difficult year for those in the South and Midwest United States. Following are a collection of images that show the destruction created from the tornadoes this year.

  • Countries Most Vulnerable To Food Shock Tuesday, 26 Apr 2011 | 12:18 PM ET
    Recent events in the Middle east and northern Africa have show that the supply and price of food can lead to major social unrest and even the downfall of a government. Many in the developed world take food for granted, but in most developing nations it can be a daily struggle and a life-and-death issue. The global recession of 2008-09 took some the wind out of surging agricultural prices, but there's growing concern that globalization will ultimately tax food supplies. Population and income grow

    Many in the developed world take food for granted, but in most developing nations it can be a daily struggle and a life-and-death issue. Click to see which countries are most vulnerable to food shock.

  • After Storms, a Widespread Path of Death and Damage Monday, 18 Apr 2011 | 5:53 AM ET

    More than 90 tornadoes — described by one meteorologist as a “family” of them — hit the state of North Carolina on Saturday, causing widespread damage, reports the New York Times.

  • Crises in Japan Ripple Across Global Economy Monday, 21 Mar 2011 | 5:27 AM ET
    80-year-old Sumi Abe is rescued from her destroyed house nine days after the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami on March 20, 2011 in Ishinomaki, Miyagi, Japan.

    In the wake of Japan’s cascading disasters, signs of economic loss can be found in many corners of the globe, from Sendai, on the battered Japanese coast, to Paris to Marion, Ark., reports the New York Times.

  • Bracing for a Choppy Earnings Season Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 11:41 AM ET

    Terrible weather in January, a spike in gasoline prices in February and a devastating earthquake in Japan in March: any of those three factors can bring a hiccup in earnings and taken together it seems more likely than not that they will.

  • Japanese Disaster to Delay Nuclear Plans: Expert Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 10:30 AM ET
    Fukushima Daiichi Plant_200.jpg

    Plans to develop new nuclear reactors may have to be put on hold until world leaders assess the causes of Japan's nuclear disaster and how to prevent a repeat of the accident, Luis Echavarri, director of the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency told CNBC.

  • Nikkei Losses to Double: Economist Friday, 18 Mar 2011 | 4:10 AM ET

    As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • Knee-jerk reactions to catastrophes often fall wide of the mark, Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC told CNBC.

  • For Europe and China, Nuclear Crisis Renews Fears Thursday, 17 Mar 2011 | 4:50 AM ET
    Nuclear Power Plant

    As Japan’s nuclear crisis intensified Wednesday, governments across Europe remained at odds over whether to scale back nuclear power programs or continue plans to expand, reports the New York Times.

Contact Weather


    Get the best of CNBC in your inbox

    Please choose a subscription

    Please enter a valid email address
    To learn more about how we use your information,
    please read our Privacy Policy.