×

Europe Top News and Analysis Netherlands

  • Prince William and Kate Middleton

    Royal weddings can generally be counted on to produce plenty of pomp and circumstance, not to mention — later on, of course — a possible future king or queen. In Britain, the approaching wedding of Prince William, second in line to the throne, to Kate Middleton, his longtime girlfriend, comes with a whole new set of expectations. The NYT reports.

  • Asian Couple Embracing in Front of New Home

    As Chinese property prices skyrocket and with cooling measures put in place, more and more mainland buyers are finding more value in overseas markets.

  • greece_athens_academy_2_200.jpg

    A new law devised to help Greece crack down on tax cheats is only one of the many efforts Greek authorities have made over the past year to change what has long been a way of life in this country — rampant tax evasion. But so far, to little avail. The New York Times reports.

  • protestors irish prime ministers office

    The leading party in Ireland's national election campaign wants to spread the pain from the nation's bank collapse to investors in bank bonds.

  • Euro bills

    Traders point to the fact that there is no sign that Europe’s credit markets are beginning to seize up as they did last spring, with banks worrying about each other’s counter-party risk. That’s evident from the fact that there is no spike in LIBOR, the interest rate at which banks borrow unsecured cash from each other on London's wholesale market.

  • Marchers shake hands with Egyptian Army soldiers on tanks during a demonstration against President Hosni Mubarek in Tahrir Square January 29, 2010 in Cairo, Egypt. Egytian soldiers were for the most part interacting peacefully with the marchers in Tahrir Square during the afternoon hours.

    The Egyptian military defends the country, but it also runs day care centers and beach resorts.  Since the ouster last week of President Hosni Mubarak, of course, the military also runs the government. And some say it has already begun taking steps to protect the privileges of its gated economy, reports the New York Times.

  • Spain

    Spanish savings banks, which have been ordered to raise more capital by the government, are facing an uphill struggle to persuade investors to help them improve their balance sheets, reports the New York Times.

  • Global Credit Crisis

    The woes of WestLB, which has received $11 billion in taxpayer support since 2009, are symptomatic of a larger problem in the German economy. Many of its biggest banks are still on government life support after making bad lending bets during the bubble years. The New York Times reports.

  • "While valuations are not yet stratospheric we question where the support may come from for continued earnings growth in 2012 and 2013," Pedro de Noronha, managing partner at Noster Capital in London, said.

  • wallstreet_sign_red_traffic_light_200.jpg

    The French financial markets regulator has begun to require hedge funds and other investment managers to disclose their short positions when they reach 0.5 percent of a company’s outstanding stock, reports the New York Times.

  • BOE_night3_200.jpg

    A central banker need not be loved, but at the least he should command respect — and in Britain these days Mervyn King cannot count on either, reports the New York Times.

  • Reichstag Parliment building, Berlin, Germany

    Employers in many sectors of the German economy are facing labor shortages, under the dual pressures of an aging population and inflation-fighting measures that have kept wages low in comparison with its neighbors.  The NYT reports.

  • egypt_protests_020211_240.jpg

    As protests continued for a 12th day, Egypt's newly named vice president and other top military leaders were discussing steps to limit President Mubarak’s decision-making authority and possibly remove him from the presidential palace in Cairo, the NYT reports.

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel

    When the heads of the EU meet in Brussels on Friday, they will hear new ideas on how to save the euro, delivered by Mrs. Merkel and the French president, Nicolas Sarkozy, but written largely in Berlin, reports the New York Times.

  • couple_beach_chairs_200.jpg

    Retiring in another country used to be a foreign concept to most Americans but it’s becoming more common thanks to two main factors: the Internet and the economy.  "All you have to do is think outside the border," one expat said.

  • Lewis said he found it “amazing” that the Irish government has “socialized” the banks—some $80 billion in senior and subordinated debt—and made it the financial responsibility of Irish taxpayers, who didn’t create it.

  • European Central Bank

    The European Central Bank suspended its emergency purchases of euro zone government bonds last week as the debt crisis eased, allowing it to focus on combating rising inflation, reports the Financial Times.

  • Egyptian demonstrators shout slogans next to burning police vehicles in Cairo on January 28, 2011.

    Some accuse the Mubarak government of deliberately fanning class tensions to create demands for the restoration of its brutal security state. But such resentments have built up here for nearly a decade. The NYT reports.

  • Euro bills

    An overwhelming majority of business and financial leaders from around the world think there is a chance that one or more eurozone countries will leave monetary union over the next three years, reports the Financial Times.

  • European Central Bank

    Europe’s banking system is returning to health amid signs that financial institutions are no longer hoarding cash, according to key indicators, reports the Financial Times.