Your Money Your Vote

  • Financial professionals work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange at midday as President Obama gives a speech about Wall Street financial reform.

    Midterm election years are usually  before-and-after stories for the stock market.  "The before is almost always negative and the after is almost always positive," says Sam Stovall of  Standard & Poor's.  This year, however, could be different.

  • Taxes

    For all of the political noise about tax policy, cuts, it is hard to make a convincing case that either cuts or hikes make much of a difference in economic growth or job creation. "I really don't think you can," says one economist.

  • CNBC gives cutting-edge coverage of the 2010 midterm elections, with analysis that impacts people on both Wall Street and Main Street. Here is the latest analysis from reporters on the  front lines.

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    Here's a look at the congressional seats, governorships, state legislatures and some of the ballot measures that will be on ballots around the country on Nov. 2.

  • Voters

    Voters were intensely worried about the future of the economy, a tide of dismay that rolled through groups that can swing elections—women, independents, suburbanites—and turned more of them toward Republicans.

  • Marijuana joint

    California voters said no thanks to a ballot initiative that would have made it the first state to legalize marijuana for recreational use and sales.

  • Call it the business platform. Players from the world of business and finance—CEOs, investment managers, entrepreneuers—often move into the world of politics and government and the 2010 election is no exception. This year, some three dozen business types are running for public office, stressing the importance of their business skills at a time when the economy is struggling to recover from a recession and government borrowing is at a record high. If successful, they'll be following in the footst

    Players from the world of business and finance—CEOs, investment managers, entrepreneuers—often move into the world of politics and government and the 2010 election is no exception.

  • Stubbornly high unemployment among other economic problems and a surprisingly unpopular health care reform page will reshape the composition of the the US Congress as well as bring changes to state houses in the 2010 election. With all 435 House seats and 37 Senate seats up for grabs—thanks partly to a number of retiring incumbents—the election could very well reshape the balance of power; Republicans could take a big bite out of the Democrats' large majorities and might even gain control of one

    CNBC will track several key mid-term election contests that distill the dollars-and-cents dilemmas facing Americans as they choose new representatives, senators and governors this fall.

  • US Capitol Building at dawn

    A midterm election yielding a GOP Congress to offset a Democratic president, seasonal factors and stocks' status as a "humiliated asset class" should combine to power a sizable rally in the coming months.

  • New York Republican gubernatorial candidate Carl Paladino told CNBC Thursday that he would slash spending and taxes across the state, especially for businesses.

  • Your Money Your Vote - A CNBC Special Report

    California gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman told CNBC Friday that the “way forward,” out of the state's bloated government, deficit and high taxes, was to look at what New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has done since taking office.

  • Your Money Your Vote - A CNBC Special Report

    Jerry Brown, California attorney general and gubernatorial candidate, told CNBC Friday that he has a history of balancing the state’s budget, coming up with a surplus and overseeing job growth, as governor previously.

  • The balance of power in both houses of Congress are at stake in November's midterm elections. As we countdown to November 2nd, we want to know what issue matters most to the investing public.

  • "Remember in November" Rally in DC

    If there is a single message unifying Republican candidates this year, it is a call to grab hold of the federal checkbook, slam it closed and begin to slash spending. But while polls show that the Republicans’ message is succeeding politically, Republican candidates and party leaders are offering few specifics about how they would tackle the nation’s $13.7 trillion debt. The NYT reports.

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    In Washington, the election outcome is a foregone conclusion – a solid GOP victory in the House, well in excess of the 39-seat magic number, with the Democrats narrowly retaining the Senate. Not only is this outcome conventional wisdom inside the Beltway, but it appears to be fully priced into the markets as well.

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    A healthy dose of balance and good old fashioned Washington debate might be just what is needed for investors. 

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    Three days after the midterms, whichever politicians make it to Washington will get a stark reminder of one of the key challenges they're likely to face during the coming term—the unemployment number, which lands this Friday. Indeed, for many the number may come to be the one issue which defines their tenure in office.

  • California Flag

    Change is coming. People are angry. The Republicans are energized. They will rise up Tuesday and gain power. Or so we're told. But not in California. Or so we're told.

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    I’ve lived through many presidential and mid-term elections, and I don’t recall seeing this level of anguish, frustration, and outright anger from the American people. We’re in unchartered territory.

  • Rand Paul

    Rand Paul, Republican candidate for Senate from Kentucky and Tea Party leader, called for the automatic sunsetting of federal regulations, unless they are approved by Congress.

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