Top Stories
Top Stories
Slideshows

Highlights from the Tokyo Motor Show 2009

Tokyo Motor Show 2009
It was an 'electric parade' at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show as many auto manufacturers announced plans to enhance their line up of electric cars. CNBC Asia Pacific was on-the-ground covering the event this week and the team took snapshots of the new concept cars that are set to drive the green revolution.

It was an 'electric parade' at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show as many auto manufacturers announced plans to enhance their line up of electric cars.

CNBC Asia Pacific was on-the-ground covering the event this week and the team took snapshots of the new concept cars that are set to drive the green revolution.

Posted 23 Oct 2009

Honda Skydeck
Honda unveiled a sporty minivan concept called the Skydeck -- a six-seater hybrid MPV that's best identified by its Lambo-style sissor front doors, glass roof and floating seats. The battery has been placed in the center console along the cabin floor which the seats are mounted to. This frees up more space inside -- ideal for family a car.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

Honda unveiled a sporty minivan concept called the Skydeck -- a six-seater hybrid MPV that's best identified by its Lambo-style scissor front doors, glass roof and floating seats. The battery has been placed in the center console along the cabin floor which the seats are mounted to. This frees up more space inside -- ideal for family a car.

Nissan Land Glider
A green, lean machine -- Nissan's tiny two-seater concept is 122 inches long, 43 inches wide, and 55.7 inches high. The electric car, which runs on a prototype that is part motorcycle, leans at a 17-degree angle when taking curves at full speed.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

A lean, green machine -- Nissan's tiny two-seater concept is 122 inches long, 43 inches wide, and 55.7 inches high. The electric car, which runs on a prototype that is part motorcycle, leans at a 17-degree angle when taking curves at full speed.

Lotus Stealth
The Lotus Exige Stealth (known as Scura in Europe) sports a menacing matte black finish with contrasting stripes. The extensive use of carbon fiber has helped shave off 22 lbs. off the a standard-issue Exige S. It hits 62 mph in a 4.1 seconds and 100mph in under ten.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

There's nothing green about this car - just pure power. The Lotus Exige Stealth (known as Scura in Europe) sports a menacing matte black finish with contrasting stripes. The extensive use of carbon fiber has helped shave off 22 lbs. off the a standard-issue Exige S. It hits 62 mph in a 4.1 seconds and 100mph in under ten.

Lexus LF-A
There'll be nothing green about the next few cars featured here - just pure power. The Lexus LF-A supercar, which made its world debut at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show, reportedly cracks the zero to 100 km/h run in 3.7 seconds. At a pricetag of $375,000, Toyota claims the LF-A is the most powerful car it has ever produced.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

The Lexus LF-A supercar, which made its world debut at the 2009 Tokyo Motor Show, reportedly cracks the zero to 100 km/h run in 3.7 seconds. At a pricetag of $375,000, Toyota claims the LF-A is the most powerful car it has ever produced.

Honda U3-X
Forget the Segway. Here comes Honda's futuristic self-balancing personal mobility device which uses the technology originally developed for ASIMO the robot. The large wheel contains a series of smaller wheels that rotate independently --  allowing users to go forward, backward, side-to-side or diagonally, all being controlled with a simple lean.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

Forget the Segway. Here comes Honda's futuristic self-balancing personal mobility device which uses the technology originally developed for ASIMO the robot. The large wheel contains a series of smaller wheels that rotate independently --  allowing users to go forward, backward, side-to-side or diagonally, all being controlled with a simple lean.


Lexus LF-CH
Lexus' hatchback hybrid concept has been billed as the green answer to BMW's 1-Series cars. It uses Toyota's Hybrid Synergy Drive and comes with a V10 petrol engine. It boasts a top speed of 325 km/h (202 mph), with an acceleration of zero to 100 kph in 3.7 seconds.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

Lexus' hatchback hybrid concept has been billed as the green answer to BMW's 1-Series cars. It uses Toyota's Hybrid Synergy Drive and comes with a V10 petrol engine. It boasts a top speed of 325 km/h (202 mph), with an acceleration of zero to 100 kph in 3.7 seconds.

Honda CR-Z
The first hybrid to come with a manual six-speed transmission, the CR-Z is said to have significantly better performance than the fuel-economy Insight. Using a 1.5-liter i-VETEC 4-cylinder, the car will be introduced to Japan next February and North America in the fall of 2010. The CR-Z is slated to be priced between $19,000 to $25,000.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

The first hybrid to come with a manual six-speed transmission, the CR-Z is said to have significantly better performance than the fuel-economy Insight. Using a 1.5-liter i-VETEC 4-cylinder, the car will be introduced to Japan next February and North America in the fall of 2010. The CR-Z is slated to be priced between $19,000 to $25,000.

Toyota Prius Plug-In
The much-anticipated plug-in Prius hybrid made its debut at the Tokyo Motor Show. Using the Hybrid Synergy Drive system, Toyota hopes to launch the first 500 versions using lithium-ion batteries, instead of nickel-metal hydride, used in the existing Prius.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

The much-anticipated plug-in Prius hybrid made its debut at the Tokyo Motor Show. Using the Hybrid Synergy Drive system, Toyota hopes to launch the first 500 versions using lithium-ion batteries, instead of nickel-metal hydride, used in the existing Prius.

Nissan Leaf
This zero-emission car is slated to be launched late 2010 in Japan, the U.S. and Europe. The Leaf has a top speed of up to 90mph and drives about 100 miles per charge. It takes about 4-8 hours to get fully juiced-up on a 220V home charging unit and 26 minutes to be 80% full at quick-charge stations.
Photo: Martin Conroy, CNBC Asia Pacific

This zero-emission car is slated to be launched late 2010 in Japan, the U.S. and Europe. The Leaf has a top speed of up to 90mph and drives about 100 miles per charge. It takes about 4-8 hours to get fully juiced-up on a 220V home charging unit and 26 minutes to be 80% full at quick-charge stations.