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Mergers and Acquisitions
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Top 10 Best (and Worst) Mergers of All Time

Big oil got even bigger in 1999, when Exxon and Mobil signed an $81 billion agreement to merge and form ExxonMobil. Not only did Exxon Mobil become the largest company in the world, it reunited its 19th Century former selves — John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company of New Jersey (Exxon) and Standard Oil Company of New York (Mobil). The merger was so big, in fact, that the FTC required a massive restructuring of many of Exxon and Mobil’s gas stations, in order to avoid outright monopolization

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Exxon and Mobil

Big oil got even bigger in 1999, when Exxon and Mobil signed an $81 billion agreement to merge and form ExxonMobil. Not only did Exxon Mobil become the largest company in the world, it reunited its 19th Century former selves — John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company of New Jersey (Exxon) and Standard Oil Company of New York (Mobil). The merger was so big, in fact, that the FTC required a massive restructuring of many of Exxon and Mobil’s gas stations, in order to avoid outright monopolization (despite the FTC’s 4-0 approval of the merger).

ExxonMobil remains the strongest leader in the oil market, with a huge hold on the international market and dramatic earnings. In 2008, ExxonMobil occupied all ten spots in the “Top 10 Corporate Quarterly Earnings” (earning more than $11 billion in one quarter) and it remains one of the world’s largest publicly held companies (second only to Walmart).

Source: Rasmussen College School of Business/Rasmussen College Online

Photo: Henny Ray Abrams | AFP | Getty ImagesSource: Rasmussen College School of Business/Rasmussen College Online